Blair's doodles show that he is 'struggling to keep control of confusing world'

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He is full of nervous energy but likes to keep things firmly in their own compartments and, while aiming high, is struggling to maintain control in a confusing world full of major problems. And he is not a natural leader, but more of a spiritual person, like a vicar.

He is full of nervous energy but likes to keep things firmly in their own compartments and, while aiming high, is struggling to maintain control in a confusing world full of major problems. And he is not a natural leader, but more of a spiritual person, like a vicar.

Those are some of the deductions being gleaned from an analysis of the doodlings of Tony Blair, scribbled by the Prime Minister on a notepad he left at the World Economic Forum at Davos this week.

Most people's doodlings would tend to focus on prosaic aide-memoirs such as, "Ring plumber" or a caricature of the boss. But when you are Tony Blair, sharing a debate with Bill Gates, the Microsoft founder and Bono, the singer with U2, you get to doodle on the big issues, Aids, Third World debt and taxes. There is no, "Call Cherie" or even an "Must ask Alastair". Instead, there are some curious circles, boxes and triangles, into which much is being read.

The page has proved irresistible to psychologists and graphologists who specialise in the analysis of handwriting and are increasingly used by various bodies including police and large companies to determine the personality of individuals. And they want new insights into the various stresses and strains besetting the Prime Minister.

The forum is designed as a place where the world's movers and shakers from politics and industry get together to mull over the big global issues.

The Independent asked Helen Taylor, a graphologist, to analyse the writing and, just for fun, Nina Ashby, a clairvoyant who specialises in the interpretation of patterns, to investigate Mr Blair's extensive use of symbols. She said: "It shows he's full of aggressive, nervous energy, which is driving him on. But it is not rooted in practicality. It's more aspirational, as indicated by the slanting writing. A more practical person would be expected write more horizontally.

"The boxes suggest he is trying to compartmentalise things, possibly for delegation, but some look as if they are going to collapse. The relative sizes of the boxes and the letters indicate his priorities."

She added: "I think he's under pressure, trying to complete his circles, but not always succeeding. And it suggests this is not a natural leader. It is a person of a religious nature, perhaps a vicar, not sure of his priorities." Ms Ashby concluded that Mr Blair was easily able to compartmentalise matters; organisations such as the G8 and the International Finance Fund are firmly ringed and boxed. "But as you get further down, the boxes and circles and triangles overlap and crowd in on each other and the focus is on issues, such as Aids and trade.

"Look at the triangle goalposts: one is trapped among circles and boxes, the other free and isolated. It creates a more confusing picture and suggests things are in danger of getting out of control."

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