Britain's challenge to Blair: Show us the evidence

KANYA KING, 42, FOUNDER MOBO MUSIC AWARDS

Qualified support for the war

I don't think anyone supports a war, but if it's the only way of getting rid of an evil dictator it has to be the last resort. Time will tell if Tony Blair misled the country, but if theresult is peace and harmony, the sacrifice will not be in vain.

TIM ELKINGTON, 32, MANAGING DIRECTOR

Former Labour supporter, south London. Opposed the war

I think Blair could have been lying and that if he did it would be the most serious thing to have happened in British politics for a long time. There has to be a public inquiry.

MICHAEL POOLE, 40, CAB DRIVER

No party allegiance, Birmingham. Supported the war

Blair was right to go to war because Saddam Hussein is a tyrant. I don't think he misled the country because the information on chemical weapons comes from a variety of sources and can't all be revealed.

MICHAEL EAVIS, 67, FOUNDER OF GLASTONBURY FESTIVAL

Former Labour Party candidate. Opposed the war

He [Tony Blair] misled me personally because he gave the impression he didn't want to go to war. There has been enormous political flak, it's been unsettling for the whole world. It's been a disaster.

RON JAMES, 60, PAINTER AND DECORATOR

Former Labour supporter, from south London. Opposed the war

I think it was wrong to invade another man's country. It wasn't about weapons of mass destruction. It was all cooked up to allow us to grab the oil. It was wrong, wrong, wrong.

KAOUTHAR KHARKOUR, 21, PHARMACY ASSISTANT

Conservative supporter, from south London. Supported the war

The Iraqis might still have these weapons hidden, although they might not exist, but that country is now free ... The war was right because of the way it will improve the lives of the Iraqi people.

STEPHEN TINDALE, 40, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, GREENPEACE UK

Floating voter (former Labour party special adviser). Opposed the war

[Tony Blair] presented the evidence as stronger than it was. Even if Saddam had WMD, the proper and effective way to deal with them was through the weapons inspectors.

CLAIRE RAYNER, 72, WRITER AND BROADCASTER

Liberal Democrat supporter. Opposed the war

I knew all along they were lies. All they wanted was oil. Our Government, our country went along with it - and why? I am still in a state of shock about it. They lied through their teeth, they lied, lied, lied.

GAYNELLE SAMUEL, 44, UNION OFFICIAL

Labour supporter, from south London. Supported the war

I felt that something needed to be done, but my concern was that Britain was being railroaded by the Americans. I don't think Blair lied... It was right to get rid of Saddam.

MONA SAR, 33, RESTAURANT OWNER

No political allegiance, from Glasgow. Opposed the war

The scare stories about weapons of mass destruction were just an excuse and the real reason is more to do with oil and money. There's no doubt Saddam was evil but Blair is a power-hungry maniac.

RAY TANCOCK, 52, CARPENTER

Declined to reveal allegiance, from Cornwall. Supported the war

We are bringing our troops home too early. We should have stayed until these weapons were found. I don't think Tony Blair misled the country.

(Mr Tancock's adopted son, Sergeant Steven Roberts, was the first soldier to die in combat in Iraq.)

JOHN PEEL, 63, RADIO PRESENTER

Disillusioned Labour supporter. Opposed the war

I thought it was gangster capitalism, nothing to do with morality at all. Did Tony Blair mislead the country? I suspect he did. He may have misled himself and just allowed himself to be talked into believing something.

LORD HEALEY, 85, POLITICIAN

Former deputy leader of the Labour Party. Opposed the war

I was against the whole project from the start, and events since have strengthened my view. All the evidence I have seen suggests they twisted the evidence on weapons of mass destruction.

LAKVINDER SINGH, 22, STUDENT

Labour supporter, from Birmingham. Supported the war

I first thought the war was a bad idea but, having seen pictures of Iraqi suffering, I changed my mind. There's probably weapons of mass destruction. I honestly believe Tony Blair when he says that.

ANDREW SYME, 53, CHARTERED SURVEYOR

Conservative supporter, from Glasgow. Supported the war

The war was justified and the discovery of what has been happening there under Saddam proves that. I think Iraq did have WMD ... but on humanitarian grounds the war was right.

PAULINE BARNETT, 52, RETIRED PA

Conservative supporter, from south London. Supported the war

I agreed the war was for the Iraqi people but also that we had to get rid of these weapons. Tony Blair should have been truthful and said it was about stopping the killing in Iraq. But he lied instead.

AAMIR ZUBERI, 36, DOCTOR

No political allegiance, from Glasgow. Opposed the war

On humanitarian grounds Saddam was an evil tyrant who deserved to be deposed, but that's not the reason we were told we were going to war ... We should let the Iraqi people get on with their lives.

LORD BELL, 61, PR GURU

Conservative supporter. Supported the war

I don't know if Tony Blair has misled the country but there is some doubt. I thought The Independent's front-page headline was absolutely correct. If he's got real evidence, why the hell doesn't he produce it?

JUSTIN SMITH, 35, TAX CONSULTANT

Labour supporter, from South Yorkshire. War sceptic

I wasn't convinced about the argument for war; it was all a bit woolly. Then after the war I did think, 'Well, all's well that ends well'. But when there is doubt whether weapons existed, I'm not sure.

TRACEY EMIN, 39, ARTIST

Labour waverer. Opposed the war

I think that Tony Blair has misled the country. It is wrong to kill innocent people. Just because Saddam Hussein was doing that, it doesn't mean we should do the same. It could have been sorted out in another way.

JEAN THOMSON, 43, CIVIL SERVANT

Labour supporter, from Glasgow. War sceptic

I didn't think the Government handled the issue of WMD well and some evidence was misleading but ... with the mass graves and torture, what we did was right, even if for the wrong reasons.

ALEX MISIK, 17, STUDENT

No party allegiance, from Leeds, West Yorkshire. Opposed the war

I'm not really sure we'll know the real reason for going to war. But I do think that Britain and America had alternative motives to the discovery of chemical weapons. I just don't trust Tony Blair or George Bush.

ASLAM FAIZ, 19, WAITER

No political allegiance, from Leeds. Opposed the war

Soldiers fought and lost their lives for no reason at all. There was no real purpose. If leaders were so concerned about the war against terror, why didn't armies concentrate on al-Qa'ida and Bin Laden?

PIERS MORGAN, 38, EDITOR OF THE 'DAILY MIRROR'

Vehemently opposed the war

I didn't support the war because, as we said, there was no clear evidence that Saddam possessed these weapons. If Saddam didn't have any weapons of mass destruction the war was a con and the Mirror will be absolutely vindicated.

SOLA POPSON, 24, STUDENT

Labour supporter, from Glasgow. Supported the war

They might not have found any evidence of WMD but the cause was a just one. Saddam was an evil dictator who had to be brought down. Tony Blair is my man now, and I'll vote for him.

MARK SELLARS, 35, LABOURER

Labour supporter, from West Yorkshire. Supported the war

I think Tony Blair is an excellent Prime Minister. He was entirely justified. The point is the problem did exist and Saddam Hussein was responsible for harbouring and financing terrorist activity.

JOANNA DAVIES, 20, CARE ASSISTANT

Labour supporter, from Leeds. Supported the war

I thought we were left with no alternative [to war]. I'm now disappointed in Tony Blair. I want to trust Mr Blair but the fact that chemical weapons have not been found is putting doubt in my mind.

SIR SEAN CONNERY, 72, ACTOR

SNP supporter. Opposed the war

I thought all they had to do was convince all the people of the UN that there was [WMD]. It's like taking a hammer to kill a fly. There seems to be people even in [Tony Blair's] own camp who believe he has [misled the country].

Comments