Germany's treatment of Greece is an anti-democratic disaster, says London Mayor Boris Johnson

The Mayor is the latest UK figure to speak out

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Germany’s policy towards Greece's debt is an anti-democratic “disaster”, the Mayor of London has said.

Boris Johnson is the latest in a string of British establishment figures to question Germany’s policy and perhaps the highest ranking politician to speak publicly against it so strongly.

“[The policy] is a disaster and it is high time we denounced [the] immolation of Greek democracy,” he tweeted.

Mr Johnson, who is also a Conservative MP and who attends political Cabinet, was asked his view during an online Q&A.

Greece held a referendum on whether to accept a deal from its creditors, including Germany, and rejected it.

However a week later it accepted the deal after a series of events that included a tightening of policy by the European Central Bank.

The deal has caused a split within Greece’s leftist anti-austerity governing party and was branded anti-democratic by many Greeks and other observers.

The hashtag #ThisIsACoup trended worldwide, a reference to the deal’s supposed anti-democratic nature.

Yesterday the Governor of the Bank of England questioned the deal reached between Greece and its creditors to avert a default.

“The profile of the debt, in the judgement of the IMF and I believe other authorities – and we would share those judgements – is not sustainable in its current form,” he told a meeting of Parliament’s Treasury Select Committee.

“In addition there is an observation about the necessity of smoothing the debt profile. That will be required at current exchange rates within the euro in order to return to sustainable growth.”

Eurozone authorities have committed to future talks on debt relief for the austerity-stricken Mediterranean country but have not given any concrete assurances.

The prospect of relief comes after a commitment by the country’s left-wing government to billions of euros of austerity, including pension and VAT reforms.

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