Jeremy Corbyn on the Calais crisis: 'Do we deal with it militarily or on basis that we're all human beings?'

'Do we approach the issues of the world on the basis of our ability to militarily invade or do we approach it on the basis that we’re all human beings?'

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Indy Politics

Jeremy Corbyn has criticised David Cameron's response to the migrant crisis in Calais, arguing that the Prime Minister has dealt with the issue in a military capacity rather than a humanitarian one.

Up to 100 extra security guards have been stationed at Calais to try to deal with the growing number of migrants trying to break into the Channel Tunnel. Mr Cameron - who drew criticism for describing the over 3,000 migrants camped out in Calais as "a swarm" - has decided to deal with the issue with more fencing, more resources and extra sniffer dog teams.

The Government also announced that British immigration officers and French police are to work side by side at Eurotunnel’s control room at Coquelles, making it easier to respond quickly to attempts by migrants to break into the tunnel.

Yet Mr Corbyn, the surprise front-runner in the Labour leadership contest, argued that the government's focus on the Calais crisis was misplaced at a rally in north London.

"You look down the line at Syria, you look down the line at the millions of refugees around the world, you look at those desperate people in Libya, you look at those desperate people trying to get across the Mediterranean, you look at those desperate people in Calais; none of this is simple, I'm not pretending there's an easy answer to anything, there isn't.

"But, and this is a big but, do we approach the issues of the world on the basis of our ability to militarily invade and intervene or do we instead approach it on the basis that we’re all human beings on one planet? We’re all there to support our fellow humanity."

 

 

Mr Corbyn, the Labour MP for Islington North since 1983, was speaking at a packed Camden Centre as the leadership battle nears its last month. The contest concludes on September 12.

During his 30-minute speech, Mr Corbyn told activists: "After September 12, whatever the result, don't go away and say that was a good summer 2015 ... stay together to defend what we have got but above all, stay together to bring about a country that doesn't thrive on inequality and injustice and poverty.

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