MPs to work just 27 days over summer due to EU referendum

'It’s become a part-time parliament, leaving the government free of any democratic accountability'

MPs will sit in the House of Commons for less than 30 days during the summer.

Commenting on the possibility of MPs only working for 27 days in the 92 that make up June, July and August, Labour MP John Mann said parliament had become "part-time".

Following the Whitsun recess which begins on 26 May, MPs will return to the House of Commons six days into summer on 6 June.

But due to the upcoming EU referendum, MPs will also be on recess from 15 June until 27 June, the Evening Standard reported.

They will then leave for summer on 21 July and return on 5 September.

In 2015, the House of Commons summer recess began on 21 July and ended on 7 September.

In a statement, Labour MP John Mann said: “It’s become a part-time parliament, leaving the government free of any democratic accountability.”

The reason for the longer recess this summer is due to a break coinciding with the EU referendum. On Thursday 23 June, Britain will decide whether or not to continue being a part of the 28-member European Union.

British, Irish and Commonwealth citizens over the age of 18, who are residents of the UK, will answer the following question: “Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?”

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