'They're not the answer': Ed Miliband turns up the rhetoric against Ukip

The Labour Leader attacks the Ukip party, insisting the party will "never serve the working people of Britain" - as Farage defends comments that he  would be “concerned” if Romanians moved in next door to him

Ed Miliband has turned up the rhetoric against Ukip by launching a scathing attack against the party during the Labour campaign trail.

Mr Miliband said the embattled party were intent on “keeping the flame of Thatcherism alive”, and insisted that their policies “will never serve the working people of Britain”.

The Labour leader made the remarks while campaigning in Crawley ahead of Thursday’s European Parliament elections.

Separately, Ukip party leader Nigel Farage issued a statement in which he defended comments that he would be “concerned” if Romanians moved in next door to him.

"The unfortunate reality is that we are in political union with a post-Communist country that has become highly susceptible to organised crime," he said.

"Police figures are quite clear that there is a high level of criminality within the Romanian community in Britain. This is not to say for a moment that all or even most Romanian people living in the UK are criminals.

"But it is to say that any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door.”

Ed Miliband said today: "If the question on the ballot paper next Thursday is whether we can turn Britain from a country run for a few at the top to a country run for working people once again, Ukip is not the answer".

"They claim to offer something new. But what are their answers? 'Keeping the flame of Thatcherism alive'. Bigger cuts than the Tories. Charges to see your GP. Leave Europe with all that means for investment and jobs.

"Friends, this agenda will never serve the working people of Britain."

 

Last night, Communities Secretary Eric Pickles has branded Ukip “über-nationalist” and “xenophobic” - but not racist.

Ukip are widely expected to top the poll in next Thursday’s elections to the European Parliament.

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