Winner or loser? What it all means for you

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Indy Politics

Margaret Morrissey NCPTA

"I wanted to hear where the money was going. It's no use increasing the local authorities' education budgets if it doesn't get through to schools. Also, on increasing the number of free hours of early years provision, it's just a few hours for each child. If you need care for the whole day, it will still cost a fortune."

Simon Thurley Chief Executive, English Heritage

The Chancellor has showed himself to be a champion of churches before and we like to take this as a sign that the Chancellor with a PhD in history might be more supportive of our heritage as a PM than perhaps we have seen. The Government published a White Paper on heritage and we hope the Treasury will support it.

Glen Smyth Chairman, Metropolitan Police Federation

"The big challenge that faces the public sector is boom and bust spending. We have taken on so many more staff in the police but the finances for future years look pretty bleak. There is also the issue of the new money announced mainly going to MI5 and MI6 to fight terrorism - you forget mainstream policing at your peril."

John Sauven Director of Greenpeace UK

Aviation was the elephant at the despatch box. No budget which claims to be green can ignore the impact planes make on the climate. An extra £6m for microgeneration won't meet public demand for grants to fit domestic solar panels. However, the reintroduction of the fuel escalator was a welcome move. All in all, this Budgetdid notmeet the challenge.

Nigel Humphries British Association of Drivers

The huge increase on duty on larger cars is an outrageous measure. It's a double whammy for people with less economical cars. They are paying extra duty on their vehicles as well as paying more in fuel tax. There should be a fixed amount of duty for using the roads. The variation should be on fuel.

Dr Sam Everington Deputy Chairman of the British Medical Association

Reducing VAT on nicotine replacement therapy is a good way of encouraging people to quit smoking. We are disappointed the Chancellor didn't increase the duty on tobacco beyond the rate of inflation. Higher prices are an effective way of preventing young people from starting.

Sir Geoffrey Bindman Human Rights Lawyer

The Budget ... is it really any more than a political showmanship? We read that more millions are to go to the war in Iraq but we have no balance sheet or profit-and-loss account for my particular anxiety: the destruction of legal aid will be a tragic legacy which our future prime minister can still prevent.

Deborah Arnott Director of the anti-smoking charity Ash

One in five smokers say they'll try to quit in the run-up to the smoking ban. Using nicotine products can double their chances of success but we know the cost puts many smokers off. Reducing the price will encourage more smokers to use these products. We congratulate the Government on making this Budget a quitters' Budget.

Philip Cullum Deputy Chief Executive, NCC

We welcome the cut in VAT on products that help people stop smoking. Smoking costs the economy £14bn a year and a consumer-focused approach is the best way of tackling it. We support steps towards encouraging sustainable consumption including VAT cuts on energy efficient and sustainable products... [as] consumers want to make green choices.

John Dunford General Secretary, Association of School and College Leaders

"I welcome the increase in education funding but experience tells us we have to wait until we've read the small print before we really see how schools are affected by the budget. The move towards all schools becoming extended schools (opening until 6pm) involves a huge commitment on behalf of heads."

Caroline Lucas Green Party MEP

By failing to end the tax breaks and hidden subsidies enjoyed by the airlines - worth £9bn per year - and shying away from raising taxes on gas guzzlers enough to genuinely shift drivers' behaviour, the Chancellor has demonstrated extreme contempt for the green agenda.

Brendan Barber TUC General Secretary

The Government needs to go further to 'green' the workplace and tackle climate change. There needs to be radical measures on workplace energy efficiency in the energy White Paper. And while there are useful measures in today's Budget, the Government could do more to use the tax system to encourage changes in behaviour that benefit the environment.

Tony Woodley General Secretary, T&GWU

The record levels of public spending by this Chancellor would never have happened under the Conservatives, and our members will never forget the three million on the dole and the decimation of our health service by them. Yet public sector workers continue to be shunned, while big business gets a tax cut.

Single person: No children

Gross Income/Net Income 2006/07/Net Income 2007/08/Tax Credits 2006/07/TaxCredits 2007/08/Monthly gain/(loss) 2007/08

10,000/8,621/8,689/576/666/13

15,000/11,971/12,039/0/0/6

20,000/15,321/15,389/0/0/6

25,000/18,671/18,739/0/0/6

30,000/22,021/22,089/0/0/6

35,000/25,517/25,455/0/0/-5

40,000/29,067/29,274/0/0/17

45,000/32,017/32,224/0/0/17

50,000/34,967/35,174/0/0/17

60,000/40,867/41,074/0/0/17

70,000/46,767/46,974/0/0/17

80,000/52,667/52,874/0/0/17

90,000/58,567/58,774/0/0/17

100,000/64,467/64,674/0/0/17

Single person: One child

10,000/9,533/9,630/4,526/4,756/27

15,000/12,883/12,980/2,676/2,906/27

20,000/16,233/16,330/826/1,056/27

25,000/19,583/19,680/545/545/8

30,000/22,933/23,030/545/545/8

35,000/26,429/26,396/545/545/-3

40,000/29,979/30,215/545/545/20

45,000/32,929/33,165/545/545/20

50,000/35,879/36,115/545/545/20

60,000/41,779/42,015/0/0/20

70,000/47,679/47,915/0/0/20

80,000/53,579/53,815/0/0/20

90,000/59,479/59,715/0/0/20

100,000/65,379/65,615/0/0/20

125,000/80,129/80,365/0/0/20

150,000/94,879/95,115/0/0/20

Self-employed person: One earner

10,000/8,659/8,721/576/666/13

15,000/12,159/12,221/0/0/5

20,000/15,659/15,721/0/0/5

25,000/19,159/19,221/0/0/5

30,000/22,659/22,721/0/0/5

35,000/26,262/26,232/0/0/-2

40,000/29,812/30,050/0/0/20

45,000/32,762/33,000/0/0/20

50,000/35,712/35,950/0/0/20

60,000/41,612/41,850/0/0/20

70,000/47,512/47,750/0/0/20

80,000/53,412/53,650/0/0/20

90,000/59,312/59,550/0/0/20

100,000/65,212/65,450/0/0/20

125,000/79,962/80,200/0/0/20

150,000/94,712/94,950/0/0/20

Single Pensioner: Aged over 75

10,000/9,690/9,759/0//6

15,000/13,590/13,659/0//6

20,000/17,490/17,559/0//6

25,000/20,866/20,917/0//4

30,000/24,766/24,817/0//4

35,000/28,666/28,717/0//4

40,000/32,266/32,586/0//27

45,000/35,266/35,586/0//27

50,000/38,266/38,586/0//27

60,000/44,266/44,586/0//27

70,000/50,266/50,586/0//27

80,000/56,266/56,586/0//27

90,000/62,266/62,586/0//27

100,000/68,266/68,586/0//27

125,000/83,266/83,586/0//27

150,000/98,266/98,586/0//27

Pensioner couple: Aged 65-74

10,000/10,000/10,000/0/0/0

15,000/14,978/15,000/0/0/2

20,000/19,448/19,546/0/0/8

25,000/22,360/22,479/0/0/10

30,000/26,205/26,324/0/0/10

35,000/30,083/30,188/0/0/9

40,000/33,983/34,088/0/0/9

45,000/37,883/37,988/0/0/9

50,000/41,783/41,888/0/0/9

60,000/49,583/49,688/0/0/9

70,000/57,383/57,488/0/0/9

80,000/64,626/65,256/0/0/53

90,000/70,626/71,269/0/0/54

100,000/76,626/77,269/0/0/54

125,000/91,626/92,269/0/0/54

150,000/106,626/107,269/0/0/54

Couple: Two earners, two children

10,000/11,516/11,570/6,291/6,601/30

15,000/15,407/15,599/4,441/4,751/42

20,000/18,757/18,949/2,591/2,901/42

25,000/22,107/22,299/741/1,051/42

30,000/25,457/25,649/545/545/16

35,000/28,807/28,999/545/545/16

40,000/32,157/32,349/545/545/16

45,000/35,507/35,699/545/545/16

50,000/38,857/39,049/545/545/16

60,000/45,557/45,749/0/0/16

70,000/52,549/52,481/0/0/-6

80,000/59,649/60,118/0/0/39

90,000/65,549/66,018/0/0/39

100,000/71,449/71,918/0/0/39

125,000/86,199/86,668/0/0/39

150,000/100,949/101,418/0/0/39

Couple: Two earners, one child

10,000/10,907/10,941/4,526/4,756/22

15,000/14,798/14,969/2,676/2,906/33

20,000/18,148/18,319/826/1,056/33

25,000/21,498/21,669/545/545/14

30,000/24,848/25,019/545/545/14

35,000/28,198/28,369/545/545/14

40,000/31,548/31,719/545/545/14

45,000/34,898/35,069/545/545/14

50,000/38,248/38,419/545/545/14

60,000/44,948/45,119/0/0/14

70,000/51,940/51,851/0/0/-7

80,000/59,041/59,488/0/0/37

90,000/64,941/65,388/0/0/37

100,000/70,841/71,288/0/0/37

125,000/85,591/86,038/0/0/37

150,000/100,341/100,788/0/0/37

Couple: One earner, two children

10,000/10,136/10,260/6,291/6,601/36

15,000/13,486/13,610/4,441/4,751/36

20,000/16,836/16,960/2,591/2,901/36

25,000/20,186/20,310/741/1,051/36

30,000/23,536/23,660/545/545/10

35,000/27,032/27,026/545/545/-1

40,000/30,583/30,844/545/545/22

45,000/33,533/33,794/545/545/22

50,000/36,483/36,744/545/545/22

60,000/42,383/42,644/0/0/22

70,000/48,283/48,544/0/0/22

80,000/54,183/54,444/0/0/22

90,000/60,083/60,344/0/0/22

100,000/65,983/66,244/0/0/22

125,000/80,733/80,994/0/0/22

150,000/95,483/95,744/0/0/22

Couple: Two earners, no children

10,000/10,000/10,000/2,216/2,366/13

15,000/13,891/14,028/366/516/24

20,000/17,241/17,378/0/0/11

25,000/20,591/20,728/0/0/11

30,000/23,941/24,078/0/0/11

35,000/27,291/27,428/0/0/11

40,000/30,641/30,778/0/0/11

45,000/33,991/34,128/0/0/11

50,000/37,341/37,478/0/0/11

60,000/44,041/44,178/0/0/11

70,000/51,033/50,910/0/0/-10

80,000/58,134/58,547/0/0/34

90,000/64,034/64,447/0/0/34

100,000/69,934/70,347/0/0/34

125,000/84,684/85,097/0/0/34

150,000/99,434/99,847/0/0/34

Couple: One earner, one child

10,000/9,528/9,630/4,526/4,756/28

15,000/12,878/12,980/2,676/2,906/28

20,000/16,228/16,330/826/1,056/28

25,000/19,578/19,680/545/545/9

30,000/22,928/23,030/545/545/9

35,000/26,424/26,396/545/545/-2

40,000/29,974/30,215/545/545/20

45,000/32,924/33,165/545/545/20

50,000/35,874/36,115/545/545/20

60,000/41,774/42,015/0/0/20

70,000/47,674/47,915/0/0/20

80,000/53,574/53,815/0/0/20

90,000/59,474/59,715/0/0/20

100,000/65,374/65,615/0/0/20

125,000/80,124/80,365/0/0/20

150,000/94,874/95,115/0/0/20

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