Second Nadir watch carries an innocent message: Fugitive tycoon's personal possessions go on show before auction

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The Independent Online
JUST weeks after a watch with an inscribed personal message to Asil Nadir brought about the downfall of Michael Mates, another Nadir watch with a personal message has emerged, writes Dalya Alberge.

This time, though, MPs need not fear. The inscription, on a modest white card accompanying the flamboyant gold designer watch, is from Nadir's son, Birol, in ballpoint pen. It reads: 'To Dad, Happy Birthday, Time flies, always use it to the full. Love you very much, Birol xx'.

It is among 120 items removed from Nadir's two- bedroomed flat at 80 Eaton Square by the trustees of his estate in bankruptcy. They will be auctioned on 6 August at Christie's South Kensington, for an estimated pounds 20,000.

Melvyn Gallagher, of Christie's South Kensington, said there was no theme to the collection and that, judging by the varying tastes in objects, there are 'quite a few gifts among them'. However, individual pieces give some insight into the private life of the former head of Polly Peck International, who jumped bail and fled to northern Cyprus. Videos he apparently watched include Star Trek: The Voyage Home, Hope and Glory and a number of war escape films. Books include studies of how to take over companies and several volumes on travel.

His furniture and 300-piece dinner service were yesterday locked up in a warehouse. But Christie's South Kensington showed a selection of the more personal items: among them, a framed ledger sheet with doodles, crossed-out calculations and telling words like '27th February is pay day' and 'bank loan'. The reason the sheet was framed is unknown.

A large number of items bear Mr Nadir's name, which will suit buyers wanting to show off Nadir memorabilia to their friends. A Louis Vuitton shoe suitcase (for 12 shoes) has his name on its tag; a Chinese soapstone desk seal has his name in Chinese characters on its base; four lace- fringed pillows have his embroidered initials. Judging by the number of television sets to be sold, Mr Nadir was a keen viewer. Considering that the Mayfair flat had only two bedrooms, six sets might seem excessive. Christie's will also be selling his body and face massager, fax machines, washing-machines and spin-dryer.

Neil Cooper, a partner with the chartered accountants Robson Rhodes and trustee in bankruptcy of Nadir, said: 'Our task is to realise his assets worldwide and distribute them among his creditors. Since our appointment, Mr Nadir has given, albeit generally not voluntarily, only limited assistance.'

A spokeswoman for Robson Rhodes said that there would be other sales of Nadir's property: 'We will be selling his wardrobe, his clothes. Also his paintings. They are among assets that we know exist but haven't been able to track down.'

(Photograph omitted)

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