Le Carre's Cornish coast given to Trust

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The Independent Online

John Le Carre gave a stretch of coastline to the National Trust yesterday to keep it "out of the reach of human predators".

John Le Carre gave a stretch of coastline to the National Trust yesterday to keep it "out of the reach of human predators".

The best-selling author of spy novels, whose real name is David Cornwell, has a house tucked away on rugged clifftops near Land's End at Tregiffian, Cornwall, below which is the half mile of coastline which he is donating.

"I am delighted to be able to add another bit of coastline to the public heritage," said le Carre, 68. "It is a small step in the vital conservation of this constantly threatened area.

"I hope many more landowners will join me in putting precious coast land for all time out of the reach of human predators."

It is not the first time that the writer has shown his dedication to preserving the unspoilt Cornish landscape. The normally-reclusive le Carre fought a public campaign last year against his neighbour's plans to develop an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The proposals for a large farm building would "ruin" the conservation area, he said. Council planners rejected the scheme.

His gift to the National Trust will be included in the charity's £5m Neptune Scheme which aims to protect coastline in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Richard Offen of the National Trust said he was delighted to receive the land.

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