'Robocop' to face 14 disciplinary charges

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The Independent Online

The detective said to have introduced "zero tolerance" policing to Britain is to face 14 disciplinary charges as part of a long-running corruption investigation.

The detective said to have introduced "zero tolerance" policing to Britain is to face 14 disciplinary charges as part of a long-running corruption investigation.

Detective Superintendent Ray Mallon - known as "Robocop" - was cleared in June of any criminal wrongdoing at the end of a £5m inquiry, Operation Lancet.

There were calls for a public inquiry into the investigation after the decision by the Director of Public Prosecutions not to bring criminal charges.

But Det Supt Mallon, who was investigated because of allegations that detectives at Middlesbrough police station - where he was a senior officer - offered drugs for information and confessions, may still be sacked if he is found to have grossly mismanaged his officers. Details of the disciplinary charges will be put to the Cleveland Police officer later this week. A leaked Treasury Counsel report reviewing the findings of Operation Lancet was highly critical of his management style.

Before his suspension in December 1997, Det Supt Mallon was courted by Tony Blair and the Home Secretary, Jack Straw, for his tough approach to lawlessness. Det Supt Mallon, 45, who has always maintained his innocence, said: "The charges are not serious but have been magnified by my accusers to suit their own ends in an attempt to justify to the public this lengthy and costly investigation. The public understanding of this fiasco convinces me they will not be fooled by the action being taken against me and they will see the charges for what they are."

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