'What am I bid for 15,000 circus costumes, 27 entrance turnstiles and one large replica mouse?'

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A 6ft replica mouse, 5,000 sets of cutlery and a "living beach" complete with pebbles, a bathing hut and nine Victorian swimming suits, are to go under the hammer as Dome visitors prepare to enter the ultimate millennium experience: the auction zone.

A 6ft replica mouse, 5,000 sets of cutlery and a "living beach" complete with pebbles, a bathing hut and nine Victorian swimming suits, are to go under the hammer as Dome visitors prepare to enter the ultimate millennium experience: the auction zone.

Modern art galleries, theme parks and private collectors around the world have been sent invitations to the sale of the Dome's contents in 7,000 lots from 27 February to 2 March. The full list of what is for sale was revealed yesterday.

The last public event to be held within the Greenwich building before it is stripped and turned into an information technology business park will include an auction of over 15,000 costumes - such as silver acrobats' leotards and dozens of pairs of stilts.

Six strong-men's suits and a giant "test your strength" machine, with its own over-size hammer, are being marketed to male visitors. Women can chose between a skimpy body suits and a barker girl outfit composed of velvet skirts and Victorian bodices.

Ten snowmen suits and dozens and giant animal costumes warn by the "greeters" who travelled round the Dome entertaining families and children, along with the scooters and buggies they travelled on, are also up for grabs in the biggest end-of-season sale London has ever experienced

Organisers expect the auction to raise over £3m, much of it from selling the Dome's huge infrastructure, including a 2,000-seat arena, 20 glass-fronted, stainless-steel lifts, and 100 acrylic-fabric pedestrian walkways.

Theme-park operators such as Disney, Euro Disney, Butlin's and Alton Towers have been contacted and offered the chance to revive parts of the Dome, including the body zone's insides with their giant pubic lice, a display of sperm and a mechanical pumping heart.

PricewaterhouseCoopers, the Dome's auditor, is helping to value the items, although insiders said that it was "hard to put a price tag on some of these bizarre items".

Parts of the huge pink body, which became the symbol of the Dome, are in the catalogue because the auctioneers found that the whole structure cannot be moved without damaging it.

The sale is being carried out, on the orders of the Government, by Henry Butcher, a valuer and auctioneer, which will take 10 per cent of all the money made from the sale. Some zones, such as BT's Talk Zone, are being retained by their sponsors as souvenirs.

However, the giant table football game, for 26 players, where Tony Blair took a shot on a recent visit to the Dome, will come under the hammer. So will the display advertising the greatest books of our time.

The auctioneer plans to escort private collectors around the Dome before the public auction. Some of the bidders are said to be interested in buying the building's elaborate sound system, which has 800 amplifiers and 5,000 loudspeakers, connected by 80km (50 miles) of fibre. Advance bids are being sought for over 52,000m (56,000 yards) of data cable and 20,000m of power cable used was to light the Dome.

But the public will get a chance to snap up trapezes, safety nets, juggling equipment and circus rigging from the Dome's show. Dozens of kiosks, which sold snacks to the attraction's 6.5 million visitors, as well as the saucepans, ladles and cutting board from Dome kitchens are to be sold.

"This is among the most unusual sales that we have worked on," said a spokeswoman for the auctioneer. "It really gives everyone a chance to purchase a piece of history."

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