Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Badie wanted for inciting Cairo massacre

Prosecutor demands arrest of Supreme Guide for provoking army into shooting 55 civilians dead 

Cairo

Egypt’s authorities intensified their crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood, issuing an arrest warrant for the group’s Supreme Guide Mohamed Badie over allegations that he incited Monday’s massacre in which more than 50 of his followers were shot dead.

In total, warrants were issued for nine other Muslim Brotherhood members. The news came as Brotherhood officials said they were preparing video evidence to refute the military’s claim that it had been provoked into shooting dead 55 civilians outside Cairo’s Presidential Guard headquarters.

Workers at the group’s media centre in Nasr City, the east Cairo suburb where Brotherhood supporters have been rallying since 30 June, showed The Independent what they said were unpublished videos featuring clips of troops repeatedly firing upon demonstrators.

In one example, a lone soldier can be seen taking pot shots at demonstrators as he stands on the roof of a building close to the Republican Guard headquarters, the scene of Monday’s killings. Another shows a rifleman repeatedly discharging his weapon at protesters from behind a barbed-wire barricade.

Mussab al-Shami, a volunteer at the media centre, accused the Egyptian media of accepting the army’s explanation of events and ignoring the scale of the killings. “It was a massacre,” he said. “The newspapers and television here do not want to tackle it at all. It’s because it goes against their editorial policy and because they are under pressure from the military junta.”

It was not possible to verify any of the footage, and the military has said the carnage began after its soldiers were attacked first. Video clips have also emerged which appear to show supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi wielding weapons once the clashes intensified.

But Amnesty International refuted the army’s account of the massacre, saying that its own evidence “paints a very different picture” to that projected by Egypt’s generals.

“Regardless of the fact that some protesters used violence and force, there are certain standards that the security forces need to comply with,” said Diana Eltahawy, Egypt researcher for Amnesty International.

The statement from the prosecutor general’s office said those wanted for arrest were suspected of fomenting the violence which erupted in the early hours of Monday morning. Authorities have already detained more than 600 Brotherhood members in the wake of the massacre. Many of those were released on bail, but prosecutors have announced that 206 Islamist activists must be locked up for a further 15 days.

Gehad el-Haddad, a spokesman for the Brotherhood’s political wing, said on Twitter that the arrests had been “politically motivated” and accused the authorities of using the “same old police-state tactics”.

Egypt’s revolutionary transition, which began with unbounded jubilation among its supporters, has been tarnished by Monday’s bloodshed.

Fears are growing that refuseniks within the Brotherhood will continue to undermine the process, while divisions are also beginning to emerge inside the anti-Morsi coalition.

The interim President, Adli Mansour, has issued a constitutional declaration laying out a seven-month timetable until parliamentary and presidential elections and proposing a shortened version of the constitution that defines how powers would be divided in the interim. Yet already disagreements have surfaced. The National Salvation Front, the leading coalition of liberal and secular parties, released a statement criticising the declaration on the grounds that it had not been consulted by the President, and calling for clauses to be added to, and removed from, the draft constitution.

Meanwhile campaigners from Tamarod, the revolutionary group which triggered the rebellion that toppled Mohamed Morsi, raised their own objections, including that it gives Mr Mansour the power to introduce new laws. “Adli Mansour took his decision without discussing it with anyone,” said Eman el-Mahdy, a co-founder of Tamarod. “We refuse this principle because it is the same principle which existed under the Muslim Brotherhood.”

Liberal and secular forces are keen not to repeat the mistakes of the past. Following the fall of Hosni Mubarak, many accused the military of sidelining them in a bid to cosy up to the Brotherhood.

Ostensibly at least, this is a civilian-led transition. But if political differences prove to be unbridgeable, only Egypt’s generals can fill the void.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

The Richmond Fellowship: Executive Director

£66,192 per annum including car allowance of £5,700): The Richmond Fellowship:...

Recruitment Genius: Account Manager - North West

£25000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity to join ...

Recruitment Genius: Account Manager - South West

£25000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity to join ...

Recruitment Genius: Administrator - IT - Fixed Term, Part Time

£17340 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Come and join one of the UK's leading ca...

Day In a Page

Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent