'Unnecessary and unintentional' delay allowed Algerian terrorists to siege oil plant

Flaws in the oil plant’s security and risk assessment were also highlighted during the conclusion of the inquest held at the Old Bailey

Click to follow

An “unnecessary and unintentional” delay meant government intelligence of terrorists planning to kidnap British workers in Algeria was not passed on before an armed siege at an oil plant led to the deaths of 40 workers, including six UK citizens, an inquest heard.

Flaws in the oil plant’s security and risk assessment were also highlighted during the conclusion of the inquest held at the Old Bailey.

Assistant coroner for West Sussex, Nicholas Hilliard QC, recorded verdicts of unlawful killing of six Britons and one UK-based Colombian.

The victims were all killed by al-Qaeda-linked Islamists during a four-day stand-off in January 2013 at the In Amenas complex. They were Carson Bilsland and Kenneth Whiteside, both from Scotland; Sebastian John, from the East Midlands; Stephen Green, from Hampshire; Paul Morgan and Garry Barlow, both from Liverpool, and Carlos Estrada, from Colombia but who lived in London.

The inquest heard how Mr Morgan was killed when terrorists attacked his bus convoy as it headed to the airport before bursting into the complex. A further four Britons and Mr Estrada died when they were used as “human shields”, two of them probably hit by bullets from Algerian forces. Garry Barlow died in an explosion at the base.

Comments