Welcome to the new Independent website. We hope you enjoy it and we value your feedback. Please contact us here.


View from Cairo: 'After 30 years of torture, people are angry'

If history is written by the winners, then Zaki Sultan won't be sharpening his pencil any time soon. In February, when the Egyptian uprising was in full swing, he was one of the pro-Mubarak supporters who charged his camel into Tahrir Square to try to turf out pro-democracy activists. He failed.

Yesterday, Zaki remained staunch in his support for his former leader. It was sad, he said, that the former leader was on trial.

"He was an important man, a military man," he said. "He did some good things for Egypt."

Many others who watched yesterday's unprecedented court appearance disagreed. Standing outside the police academy in eastern Cairo where the trial was being held, Ali Abu Sria said he was pleased to see the former president in the dock.

Carrying a hangman's noose – a stark illustration of his own thoughts on the case – the 49-year-old labourer said: "We've never seen a dictator in court like this before."

It was a historical allusion appreciated by other Egyptians who recognised just how startling was the sight of a caged Hosni Mubarak being tried in a civilian court after a home-grown uprising.

Mohammad al-Azazi, 22, a pharmacist who watched the trial on a big screen outside the venue, said: "It's a historical day. If somebody had hit you every day for 30 years, how would you feel? People are angry because they have had 30 years of poverty and torture."

Yet there was still a degree of sympathy for a former war hero and long-term leader who yesterday was reduced to denying criminal charges from a hospital bed.

Walid Khalid owns a stationery shop not far from Tahrir Square, which yesterday was guarded by a ring of riot police and some armoured personnel carriers. As he used the photocopier in his cupboard-sized shop, he said that a measure of lenience was required for the aging ex-autocrat.

"In my life I never thought I would see him in court," said the 30-year-old. "But I don't want him executed. We should take money from him, because he took money from us."

A taxi driver, who did not give his name, agreed. "Execution would be hard on him," he said.

But not everybody was gripped by the courtroom drama. In his shop opposite a government ministry, a shopkeeper called Mahmoud had the trial showing on a fuzzy little television on top of the soft drinks fridge. What did he think of the landmark trial? "I've been sleeping," he replied with a broad grin.