Amanda Knox set to break her silence – and pocket a fortune from book deal

 

Los Angeles

Since her release from an Italian prison, the only words that Amanda Knox has uttered in public were brief, tearful comments directed to the scrum of reporters who had gathered outside Seattle's Tacoma airport to witness her homecoming.

In a brief press conference, she thanked supporters, wondered out loud if her acquittal was all a dream, and offered no fresh disclosures about the events which had just seen her incarcerated for a little over 1,500 days.

Today, that discretion looks like a canny piece of news management. Four months after Ms Knox returned to the US, the story of the former exchange student's arrest, conviction, imprisonment and eventual release is reported to have attracted a seven-figure price tag.

A proposed memoir, based on a diary she kept before, during and after the death of her British flatmate, Meredith Kercher, is said to have sparked a bidding war between America's wealthiest publishers: Simon & Schuster, Random House, Penguin and Harper Collins.

The New York Times reported yesterday that Ms Knox and her agent, Robert Barnett – who has previously negotiated literary deals for Barack Obama and Bill Clinton – have been holding meetings with editors, publicists and senior executives from interested firms.

A guest at one of the discussions said: "Everyone fell in love with her." An employee of a publishing house bidding for the memoir commented: "The world has heard from everybody else, but the world has not actually heard from Amanda Knox."

The million-dollar value attached to Ms Knox's story is an understandable by-product of the enduring fascination she sparks on both sides of the Atlantic, despite having succeeded in staying out of the public eye since her release.

Supporters peg her as the innocent victim of a conspiracy fuelled by a hungry media, the Italian police force and a chaotic justice system. Opponents believe that she's a cunning femme fatale who got away with murder. Ms Knox, now 24, and her ex-boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, were acquitted after serving more than four years, due to concerns about the handling of DNA samples used to secure their conviction. Neither has yet answered wider questions about the case. Ms Knox's book will allow her to do that, and also help to pay off her family's considerable legal bills.

Celebrity memoirs: The big earners

Bill Clinton

The former US president received an advance of $15m for his memoirs.

Wayne Rooney

HarperCollins paid the footballer £5m for five books over 12 years.

Keith Richards

The guitarist earned £4.8m for his chronicle of his wild lifestyle.

Julian Assange

The WikiLeaks founder became the first person to disown their autobiography as "unauthorised", but still pocketed an advance of £1.2m.

Nick Clark

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Service and Installation Engineer

£22000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A fantastic opportunity has ari...

Recruitment Genius: SEO / Outreach Executive

£20000 - £23000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Our client is a global marketin...

Recruitment Genius: Junior Estimator

£17000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A fantastic opportunity has ari...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Negotiator - OTE £24,000

£22000 - £24000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An enthusiastic individual is r...

Day In a Page

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

Who remembers that this week we enter the 150th anniversary year of the end of the American Civil War, asks Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served

Homeless Veterans appeal

Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served
Downfall of Dustin 'Screech' Diamond, the 'Saved By The Bell' star charged with bar stabbing

Scarred by the bell

The downfall of the TV star charged with bar stabbing
Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Security breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Cuba's golf revolution: But will the revolutionary nation take 'bourgeois' game to its heart?

Will revolutionary Cuba take 'bourgeois' golf to its heart?

Fidel Castro ridiculed the game – but now investment in leisure resort projects is welcome
The Locked Room Mysteries: As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor Otto Penzler explains the rules of engagement

The Locked Room Mysteries

As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor explains the rules of engagement
Amy Adams on playing painter Margaret Keane in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

How I made myself Keane

Amy Adams hadn’t wanted to take the role of artist Margaret Keane, because she’d had enough of playing victims. But then she had a daughter, and saw the painter in a new light
Ed Richards: Parting view of Ofcom chief. . . we hate jokes on the disabled

Parting view of Ofcom chief... we hate jokes on the disabled

Bad language once got TV viewers irate, inciting calls to broadcasting switchboards. But now there is a worse offender, says retiring head of the media watchdog, Ed Richards
A look back at fashion in 2014: Wear in review

Wear in review

A look back at fashion in 2014
Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015. Might just one of them happen?

Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015

Might just one of them happen?
War with Isis: The West needs more than a White Knight

The West needs more than a White Knight

Despite billions spent on weapons, the US has not been able to counter Isis's gruesome tactics, says Patrick Cockburn
Return to Helmand: Private Davey Graham recalls the day he was shot by the Taliban

'The day I was shot by the Taliban'

Private Davey Graham was shot five times during an ambush in 2007 - it was the first, controversial photograph to show the dangers our soldiers faced in Helmand province
Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Many flyers are failing to claim compensation to which they are entitled, a new survey has found
The stories that defined 2014: From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions

The stories that defined 2014

From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions
Stoke-on-Trent becomes first British city to be classified as 'disaster resilient' by the United Nations

Disaster looming? Now you know where to head...

Which British city has become the first to be awarded special 'resilience' status by the UN?