Boston bomb suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev awaits special interrogation team after being captured alive in Watertown after dramatic end to huge manhunt

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

Suspect rushed to hospital after suffering serious injuries during earlier shootout

Watertown

The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing is under armed guard tonight, as special interrogators prepare to question him if and when his condition improves.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, is currently not fit to be questioned, according to officials. He was caught yesterday after a tense hunt in a Massachusetts suburb, four days after the attack which killed three and wounded more than 150.

The team planned to question Tsarnaev without reading him the Miranda rights - the statement usually read by police to suspects stating their right to remain silent and to a lawyer. Authorities plan to invoke a rare public safety exception triggered by the need to protect police and the public from immediate danger.

The FBI says "police officers confronting situations that create a danger to themselves or others may ask questions designed to neutralize the threat without first providing a warning of rights."

But Anthony Romero, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the exception applies only when there's a continued threat to public safety and is "not an open-ended exception."

The manhunt ended after nightfall on Friday, almost 24 hours since the police first got on the trail of the two suspects, Dzhokhar and his 26-year-old brother Tamerlan, immigrants of Chechen origin who lived next door in Cambridge.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was taken away on a stretcher and was admitted to hospital in a serious condition with unspecified injuries, police said. He remains seriously ill and unable to be questioned.

News of his capture led to jubilant celebrations at the scene and across the city.

In a televised address from the White House, Barack Obama said Dzhokhar's capture "closed an important chapter in this tragedy".

But he acknowledged that many unanswered questions remain about the motivations of the two men accused of perpetrating the attacks that unnerved the nation.

"The families of those killed so senselessly deserve answers," said Mr Obama, branding the suspects "terrorists".

On Thursday evening, they killed a campus policeman on the grounds of the Massachusetts of Institute Technology. Sean Collier, 26, was fatally shot when he responded to a report of a disturbance on the university grounds, officials said.

The Tsarnaev brothers then hijacked a car and briefly captured a hostage before being pursued down Memorial Drive, across the Charles river from Boston, by the police. At some point during the high-speed chase, which saw the brothers return fire and throw explosives at the police, they stopped and engaged in a shootout with officers which led to Tamerlan’s death. A transit police officer was also injured in the encounter and was in surgery on Friday.

Dzhokhar then drove off before abandoning his car and disappearing into Watertown, leading to a massive manhunt involving some 9,000 officers from state and federal law enforcement agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the US Department of Homeland Security.

The wider Boston metropolitan area was paralysed by the search, as officials shut down the public transportation system and asked residents to remain indoors.

In Watertown, which sits just west of Cambridge, officers cordoned off some twenty blocks in the early hours of Friday morning, going door by door in their hunt for the suspect.

But at dusk it seemed he had escaped, with Col Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts state police saying that authorities did not know where he went following Thursday’s chase. “He fled on foot. I don’t know where he went after that specifically,” he conceded as the Boston area lockdown was lifted shortly after 6pm on Friday.

However, less than an hour after Col Alben’s announcement, gunshots were heard in the Franklin Street area of Watertown. A resident who had been holed up inside his house through the day had come out to find traces of blood near or on the boat in his back yard. Police said that when the resident lifted the tarp, he saw a man covered with blood.

A call to the emergency services saw the swift arrival of droves of law enforcement personnel. With military helicopters hovering overhead, authorities asked Watertown residents to go back indoors. A brief stand-off ensued, with officers exchanging fire with the 19-year-old before apprehending him. Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had serious injuries when he was caught and was rushed to hospital. The wounds are thought to have been sustained during Thursday night’s shootout.

“After a vicious attack on their city, the people of Boston responded with resolve and determination,” President Obama said, speaking from the White House soon after the arrest had been confirmed. Of the thousands of law enforcement personnel involved, he said: “Tonight because of their determined efforts we’ve closed an important chapter in this tragedy.”

Three people died and more than 170 were injured when authorities say the Tsarnaev brothers planted two home-made bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in the heart of the city. Eight-year old Martin Richard, 29-year old Kyrstle Campbell and 23-year old Lu Lingzi, a Boston University graduate student from China, were killed when the bombs went off in quick succession on Monday afternoon.

No motive has yet been identified for the brothers’ actions.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Voices
Barn owls are among species that could be affected
charity appeal
News
Sarah Silverman (middle) with sister Reform Rabbi Susan Silverman (right) and sister actress Laura Silverman (left) at Jerusalem's Western Wall for feminist Hanuka candle-lighting ceremony
peopleControversial comedian stages pro-equality Hanukkah lighting during a protest at Jerusalem's Wailing Wall
Arts and Entertainment
The Bach Choir has been crowned the inaugural winner of Sky Arts’ show The Great Culture Quiz
arts + ents140-year-old choir declared winner of Sky Arts' 'The Great Culture Quiz'
Sport
After another poor series in Sri Lanka, Alastair Cook claimed all players go through a lean period
cricketEoin Morgan reportedly to take over ODI captaincy
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Finance Director

£65000 - £80000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Finance Director required to jo...

Recruitment Genius: Medico-Legal Assistant

£15000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a unique opportunity fo...

Ashdown Group: (PHP / Python) - Global Media firm

£50000 per annum + 26 days holiday,pension: Ashdown Group: A highly successful...

The Jenrick Group: Quality Inspector

£27000 per annum + pension + holidays: The Jenrick Group: A Quality Technician...

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Paul Scholes column: It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves

Paul Scholes column

It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas