Other US states face vote challenges as New Mexico changes hands

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The Independent US

Florida's vote count isn't the only one still in question during this year's unusual presidential election.

Florida's vote count isn't the only one still in question during this year's unusual presidential election.

Four more states may see their presidential votes end with recounts.

?In New Mexico, voting tallies released Friday by the clerk in the state's largest county gave Republican George W. Bush a 17-vote edge over Democrat Al Gore, a sharp reversal of a previous unofficial Gore lead of 6,825 votes. However, as many as 370 additional special absentee ballots remained to be counted next week.

Republicans have threatened to challenge close Gore victories if he draws out challenges in Florida. But New Mexico has only five electoral votes and wouldn't be enough be itself.

?In Oregon, the race may be headed for a recount. Gore was ahead by 6,092 votes. State law requires a recount if the margin is less than one-fifth of 1 percent, or about 2,800 votes. About 40,000 more votes remain to be counted in the state's mail-in balloting.

Gore called Paddy McGuire, chief aide to Oregon Secretary of State Bill Bradbury, a Democrat, on Friday and asked how the count was going. The response: "I said, 'Well, Mr. Vice President, I think we're going to pull it out for you."'

?In Iowa, Republican officials were exploring the possibility of requesting a voter recount in a state that Bush lost by less than 5,000 votes. Bush would have to write to each of Iowa's 99 county auditors by 5pm on November 16 or 17, depending on the county.

?In Wisconsin, where Bush lost by about 6,000 votes, there is no automatic recount. But a candidate may request one, and Bush officials said they were looking at that possibility.

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