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Storm Arthur: Post-tropical cyclone thunders through eastern Canada leaving 250,000 without power

The storm landed in North Carolina in the US on Thursday before tearing through eastern Canada as it makes its way to Newfoundland

Post-tropical storm Arthur barrelled its way through Canada’s Maritime provinces this weekend leaving 250,000 without power and ripping down trees as it makes it way towards Newfoundland.

The cyclone was downgraded from a hurricane yesterday, though it was still charging through towns at a speed of 72mph.

It is expected to make a second landfall on western Newfoundland later tonight after battering Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

Torrential rains and strong winds left some households without power for 48hours as energy firms wrestled to keep on top of the damage.

Nova Scotia Power said 135,000 of its customers were without power yesterday afternoon, while a New Brunswick electrical firm said 115,000 of its customers were affected.

“It's like a Tasmanian devil ripping through your backyard,” homeowner Mike Gange, from Fredericton, New Brunswick said. “It's crazy here ... at times it rains so hard you can't see 10ft in front of you.”

Mr Gange told the Associated Press that he had not seen weather that severe in his 41years as a Fredericton resident. Winds raging at 62mph in the town had torn down a maple tree in his front garden, which in turn damaged roof tiles and a rain gutter.

Electrical poles had been whipped from their bases while some roads were closed due to flood water. Flights to and from Halifax, Nova Scotia, were severely affected.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre issued a statement this morning which said that Arthur is gradually weakening.

“Winds are not expected to reach warning criteria” when it leaves the Maritime provinces and hits Newfoundland, the alert said, with heavy rainfall also thought to be largely over.

Hurricane Centre spokesman Chris Fogarty said that more rainfall is predicted for the already water-logged south-western New Brunswick after the storm leaves.

Arthur was a category two hurricane when it landed in North Carolina on Thursday, scuppering Fourth of July plans for thousands of US families and partygoers.

It only caused slight damage before travelling northeast to Canada.