Uncensored WikiLeaks cables posted online

 

Uncensored copies of WikiLeaks' massive tome of US State Department cables circulated freely across the Internet, leaving a whole new batch of US sources vulnerable to embarrassment and potential retribution.

The United States, meanwhile, denied ever cooperating with the anti-secrecy group, and blasted Wikileaks for allegedly threatening national security and the safety of confidential informants

WikiLeaks has blamed Britain's the Guardian newspaper for the breach, saying that an investigative journalist had revealed the password needed to unlock the files in a book published earlier this year. Guardian journalists countered that it was sloppy security at Julian Assange's anti-secrecy website which helped expose the cables to the world.

In a 1,600-word-long editorial posted to the Internet, WikiLeaks accused the Guardian's investigative reporter David Leigh of betrayal, saying that his disclosure had jeopardized months of "careful work" that WikiLeaks had undertaken to redact and publish the cables.

"Revolutions and reforms are in danger of being lost as the unpublished cables spread to intelligence contractors and governments before the public," WikiLeaks said in its statement

Leigh and the Guardian both denied wrongdoing, and the exact sequence of events WikiLeaks was referring to remained clouded in confusion and recriminations.

It has long been known that WikiLeaks lost control of the raw cables even before they were published. One copy of the secret documents leaked to The New York Times in the fall of 2010, and other media organizations, including The Associated Press, have since received copies independently of WikiLeaks.

But never before has the entire catalog of unredacted cables made its way to the Web.

Until recently, WikiLeaks released relatively small batches of files to its partner organizations — dozens of international media and human rights groups — so they could remove information which could put innocent people in jeopardy. Only then were the files posted online.

But with the unredacted cables now sloshing around in the public domain, all that work has effectively been thrown out the window.

In its statement, WikiLeaks laid the blame on the Guardian and an unnamed "German individual."Leigh, however, told the AP that WikiLeaks' assertion was "time-wasting nonsense."

He acknowledged that Assange had supplied him with a password needed to access the US embassy cables from a server back in July of 2010 — but said that Assange told him the site would expire within a matter of hours.

"What we published much later in our book was obsolete and harmless," Leigh said in an email. "We did not disclose the URL (web address) where the file was located, and in any event, Assange had told us it would no longer exist."

Leigh added that "I don't see how a member of the public could access such a file anyway, unless a WikiLeaks or ex-WikiLeaks person tells them where it is located and what the file was called."

Another Guardian journalist, who once worked for WikiLeaks, said that Assange was to blame, alleging that the 40-year-old Australian had recycled an old password when he republished the encrypted data later. "Personal banking sites tell you not to reuse passwords. WikiLeaks doing the same for a file of such sensitivity is gross negligence," James Ball said in a message posted to Twitter early Thursday.

Repeated attempts to reach WikiLeaks staffers for further clarification were unsuccessful, although on its Twitter feed the group contested statements by Leigh and others, warning of "continuous lies to come."

To add to the intrigue, WikiLeaks asked its 1 million or so followers to download a large coded file which it said it would decrypt at a later point. Then it threatened to directly publish the entire unredacted archive of State Department documents.

The latest in the WikiLeaks saga caps nine months or revelations which have infuriated and humiliated high-ranking officials across the world. Several people, including the US ambassador to Mexico, have lost their jobs over the disclosures.

The revelations' impact has been debated. WikiLeaks says the cables' release played a key role in setting off the mass movement that has jolted dictatorial regimes across the Arab world and has exposed wrongdoing and double-dealing across the globe.

But American officials have warned that the disclosures could also have had serious consequences for informants, activists and others named in the cables - as well as American diplomacy more widely.

WikiLeaks claimed in its editorial that it had tried to warn the US government about the impending breach. Speaking from Paris on Thursday, State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland acknowledged that the group had been in touch, but rejected any suggestion that WikiLeaks had tried to limit the damage from the latest release.
 

"We have made clear our views and concerns about illegally disclosed classified information and the continuing risk to individuals and national security that such releases cause," Nuland told reporters.

"Wikileaks has, however, ignored our requests not to release or disseminate any US documents it may possess and has continued its well-established pattern of irresponsible, reckless, and frankly dangerous actions," she said. "We are not cooperating with them."

*Julian Assange has contacted us to respond specifically to a tweet by James Ball, which is referred to in our article above.  Mr Assange categorically denies Mr Ball's contention that he (Mr Assange) re-used an old password when publishing encrypted data.  Mr Assange maintains that fault for the security breach lies with the Guardian and does not lie with himself or Wikileaks.

 

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Senior Digital Marketing Consultant

£28000 - £45000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Senior Digital Marketing Cons...

Recruitment Genius: Assistant Stores Keeper

£16640 - £18500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An Assistant Stores Keeper is r...

Recruitment Genius: Claims Administrator

£16000 - £18500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an excellent opportunit...

Recruitment Genius: Software Developer - C# / ASP.NET / SQL

£17000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Developer required to join a bu...

Day In a Page

'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk