Super Tuesday: Hillary Clinton goes from 'not-to-be trusted' to presumptive Democratic nominee

The former first lady said she wanted to make America 'whole' again

Hillary Clinton’s run for the White House has been nothing if not a roller-coaster ride. 

She went from being an assumed frontrunner to someone who could not be trusted because of her private emails servers and her seeming untrustworthiness. She then found herself being forced onto the backfoot by the energy and enthusiasm generated by a 74-year-old socialist from Vermont.

On Tuesday night, Ms Clinton, the former secretary of state who has always been a candidate who has engendered as much dislike as she has love, fought herself into pole position in the battle for the Democratic nomination. 

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Hillary Clinton is setting her sights on the general election this November

After a huge win in the South Carolina primary last Saturday, the 68-year found herself soar to victories in states across the depth and breadth of America.

“Thank you all so much. What a Super Tuesday,” she said, speaking at a celebration rally in Miami. “All across our country Democrats have voted to breakdown barriers so we can all rise together.”

US Elections: Hillary Clinton wins South Carolina primary

Ms Clinton claimed victories Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Texas, Tennnessee, Virginia, Massachusetts and American Samoa.

She congratulated Mr Sanders, who claimed victories in Vermont, Colorado, Minnesota and Oklahoma, and thanked all the people who had voted for her.

Without mentioning Donald Trump she also turned her aim at the man who appears most likely to be facing up against her in the general election this November. She said she would work for every vote and wanted everybody’s help.

“This country belongs to all people, not just the people at the top,” she said. “Not those who look one way, or worship one way, or thinks one way. America is strong when we are all strong.”

She added: “America never stopped being great. We have to make America whole. We have to fill in what has been hollowed out.”

Mr Sanders' insurgent is far from over. He won in Vermont, Oklahoma and looked in a good position for two other states.

Speaking to his supporters in Essex Junction, Vermont, he declared: “This is not just about electing a president. It's about making a political revolution!''

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