MH370: Most likely crash site yet to be explored after 101 days, satellite firm Inmarsat says

The British company analysed its data and located what it says is the "most likely" crash site, which is yet to be explored

Search teams for missing flight MH370 have yet to explore the most likely crash site, a UK-based satellite company has claimed.

Inmarsat, headquartered in London, says that it had analysed the hourly connections its spacecraft had with the Malaysian Airlines plane, calculating that it must have come down in the south of the Indian Ocean.

This “hotspot” is only now about to be searched following two months chasing sonar detections coming from the sea bed to the west of Perth, Australia.

Investigators were side-tracked by these “pings” because they offered up a viable prospect that the plane’s flight recorders were nearby. However, this search has proven to be fruitless.

"It was by no means an unrealistic location but it was further to the north east than our area of highest probability," Chris Ashton from Inmarsat told BBC’s Horizon.

Following a brief hiatus, the search is due to get underway again using Inmarsat’s conclusion as one of the main reference points.

Researchers at the firm had used its satellite data to map a number of arcs where they had last made contact with the Boeing 777. With this they used the likely trajectory of a plane on auto-pilot to find where the jet most likely fell. Earlier this week families marked 100 days since the flight disappeared Earlier this week families marked 100 days since the flight disappeared

"We can identify a path that matches exactly with all those frequency measurements and with the timing measurements and lands on the final arc at a particular location, which then gives us a sort of a hotspot area on the final arc where we believe the most likely area is," Mr Ashton said.

The Australian Navy vessel Ocean Shield deployed US submersible vehicle, Bluefin-21, in April to scour the depths of the ocean floor, but it turned up nothing.

Flight MH370 disappeared on 8 March with 239 passengers and crew on board, with its whereabouts still unknown.

The latest claims come just after the lost travellers’ families marked 100 days since their loved ones’ disappearances.

Zhang Qian, 28, quit her job and has become steadily more reclusive since her husband vanished along with the plane.

"It may be my fantasy, but what if one day he sends some distress signals and he gets saved, and that will be the end of this?" Zhang told the Associated Press.

She now visits Buddhist temples, giving her some comfort amid the uncertainty and respite from the frenzied, political toing and froing.

"At the temple, I can speak from my heart to my husband," she said.

Inmarsat says it was set up in 1979 "by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to enable ships to stay in constant touch with shore or to call for help in an emergency, no matter how far out to sea.

"[Our customers] are typically businesses and organisations that need to communicate where terrestrial telecom networks are unreliable or simply cannot reach."

Families of the missing passengers and crew have also just starting receiving initial $50,000 compensation payouts from the airline's insurer.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksNow available in paperback
Sport
Diego Costa, Ross Barkley, Arsene Wenger, Brendan Rodgers, Alan Pardew and Christian Eriksen
footballRodgers is right to be looking over his shoulder, while something must be done about diving
News
i100
Life and Style
gaming
Arts and Entertainment
Carl Barat and Pete Dohrety in an image from the forthcoming Libertines short film
filmsPete Doherty and Carl Barat are busy working on songs for a third album
Arts and Entertainment
films
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Commercial Solicitor - Leicester

Excellent Package: Austen Lloyd: LEICESTER - SENIOR COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR- An o...

Recruitment Genius: IT Support Engineer - 1st Line

£18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This IT support organisation focuses on ...

Ashdown Group: IT Support Analyst (Windows, Active Directory) - London £26k

£26000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Technical Support Analyst / IT Support Analys...

Ashdown Group: PR, Marketing & Events Executive - Southwark, London - £35,000

£30000 - £35000 per annum + benefits: Ashdown Group: PR Marketing & Events Exe...

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible