Nawaz Sharif celebrates victory in Pakistan election

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

Mr Sharif sees off challenge of both the incumbent Pakistan Peoples Party and that of Imran Khan

Khudian, Lahore

Raucous celebrations broke out in the centre of Lahore in the early hours of Sunday as Nawaz Sharif appeared certain to secure victory in Pakistan's election and the former prime minister celebrated in front of crowds of his supporters.

Sharif expressed a desire to work with all parties to solve the country's problems in a victory speech given to his supporters as his lead in the national election became apparent based on vote counts announced by Pakistan state TV. 

While it seemed likely Mr Sharif, who has twice served as the country's premier though without ever completing a term, would fall a little short of securing a simple majority, there appeared little doubt he had seen off the challenge of both the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP), which recently completed a five year term in office, and that of a resurgent Imran Khan.

"I appeal to all to come sit with me at the table so that this nation can get rid of this curse of power cuts, inflation and unemployment," Sharif said, as his supporters clapped, cheered and danced in the streets.

Pakistan's election campaign has been marred by violence with the death toll leading up to Saturday's vote totalling well over 100. On Saturday itself, it was reported that up to 29 people were killed as a result of bomb blasts in Karachi and Peshawar, and gun attacks in Baluchistan.

The centre of Pakistan's electoral contest, which nationally saw a turnout of 60 per cent, was the province of Punjab, where Mr Sharif's party has been running the provincial government.

In Punjab, voting seemed to go reasonably smoothly and security was tight and some of the 600,000 security personnel spread out across the country, many of them heavily armed, were highly visible.

It was in the city of Lahore itself, Pakistan's second largest city, that the fight between Mr Khan's Movement for Justice and Mr Sharif's PML-N was at its fiercest, as the former sportsman tried to displace the former premier from his stronghold. Mr Sharif has long enjoyed solid support from the city's business and trading communities.

Earlier in the day, groups of young men had gathered near each other chanting slogans. “Bat!” one young man shouted in Mr Khan's constituency, referring to his appropriate election symbol. “Once more for the lion!” replied a group of Mr Sharif's supporters, referring to his symbol.

On Saturday morning, droves of enthusiastic first-time supporters of Mr Khan, principally from the urban middle classes, were prominent.

“I voted for Imran Khan, I voted for change, I voted for the country,” said Haider Ali, 28, a student. “We've seen them all, the other politicians. They shouldn't come back.”

At a polling station established in the Lahore College for Women University, located in a constituency which Mr Khan was himself was contesting, one family revealed their different preferences.

Samra Atif, 27, said she and her husband, a businessman, had voted for Mr Khan. However, her mother, Farhana Salman, had voted for Mr Sharif. She had also bullied her daughter into voting for Mr Sharif's party in the provincial assembly ballot.

“Mr Khan can confront corruption, God willing,” said the younger woman's husband, Atif Suleman. “We need change right now.”

The PPP looked set to do badly in Saturday's vote. There is widespread anger and frustration across the country as a result of electricity and energy shortages, the stumbling economy and pervasive corruption, and predictions suggested it could win as few as 33 seats.

While both the PPP and Mr Sharif have been praised for their different roles on the completion of a full term by an elected government - a first for the country - there is little affection for Mr Zardari and the party has suffered from not having high-profile candidates during the campaign. The son and political heir of assassinated former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, Bilawal Bhutto, has been noticeable by his absence.

The next government will have to contend with Taliban militancy, endemic corruption, chronic power cuts and crumbling infrastructure. One of the first likely tasks will be to negotiate with the International Monetary Fund for a multi-billion-dollar bailout.

If Mr Khan's PTI  squeaks into second place ahead of the PPP, thanks to support from urban youths, who rallied behind his calls for an end to corruption and a halt to drone strikes, it would mark an end to decades of two-party dominance by the PML-N and PPP.

While supporters of Mr Khan will have been bitterly disappointed, observers said that a term as official leader of the opposition could serve both him and his party well for subsequent elections. The former cricketer remains in hospital following a fall while campaigning last week.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn evocation of the conflict through the eyes of those who lived through it
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

AIFMD Business Analyst / Consultant - Investment Management

£450 - £600 per day: Harrington Starr: AIFMD Business Analyst / Consultant - I...

Business Analyst Solvency II SME (Pillar 1, 2 & 3) Insurance

£450 - £600 per day: Harrington Starr: Business Analyst Solvency II SME (Pilla...

Manager - SAS - Data Warehouse - Banking

£350 - £365 per day: Orgtel: Manager, SAS, Data Warehouse, Banking, Bristol - ...

Web Analyst – Permanent – West Sussex – Up to £43k

£35000 - £43000 Per Annum plus excellent benefits: Clearwater People Solutions...

Day In a Page

Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve
Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition: It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans

Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition

It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans
Besiktas vs Arsenal: Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie

Besiktas vs Arsenal

Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie
Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

As the Northern Irishman prepares for the Barclays, he finds time to appear on TV in the States, where he’s now such a global superstar that he needs no introduction
Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to Formula One

Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to F1

The 16-year-old will become the sport’s youngest-ever driver when he makes his debut for Toro Rosso next season
Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

But belated attempts to unite will be to no avail if the Sunni caliphate remains strong in Syria, says Patrick Cockburn
Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I would end up killing myself in jail'

Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I'd end up killing myself in jail'

Following last week's report on prison suicides, the former inmate asks how much progress we have made in the 50 years since the abolition of capital punishment