Protest over burning of Korans in Afghanistan

 

More than 2,000 angry Afghans have gathered outside a US airbase to protest against the inadvertent burning of Korans and other Islamic religious materials.

The items are thought to have been burned as part of routine disposal of rubbish at the base.

The protesters demanded to meet the country's president over the issue and threatened to demonstrate again if their demand was not met.

US Gen John Allen, the top commander in Afghanistan, apologised and ordered an investigation into the incident, which he was "not intentional in any way."

The incident stoked anti-foreign sentiment that already is on the rise after nearly a decade of war in Afghanistan and fuelled the arguments of Afghans who believe foreign troops are not respectful of their culture or Islamic religion.

As word of the incident spread, about 100 demonstrators gathered outside the Bagram Air Field, north of Kabul in Parwan province this morning. As the crowd grew, so did the outrage.

"Die, die, foreigners!" the demonstrators shouted. Some fired hunting guns into the air. Others threw rocks at the gate of the base.

Ahmad Zaki Zahed, chief of the provincial council, said US military officials took him to a burn pit on the base where 60 to 70 books, including Korans, were recovered. The books were used by detainees once incarcerated at the base, he said.

"Some were all burned. Some were half-burned," Mr Zahed said, adding that he did not know exactly how many Korans, the Muslim holy book, had been burned.

Mr Zahed said five Afghans working at the pit told him that the religious books were in the rubbish that two soldiers with the US-led coalition transported to the pit in a truck last night. When they realised the books were in the rubbish, the labourers worked to recover them, he said.

"The labourers there showed me how their fingers were burned when they took the books out of the fire," he said.

Afghan Army Gen Abdul Jalil Rahimi, the commander of a military co-ordination office in the province, said he and other officials met with protesters, tribal elders and clerics to try to calm their emotional response.

"The protesters were very angry and didn't want to end their protest," he said.

One protester, Mohammad Hakim, said if US forces can't bring peace to Afghanistan, they should go home.

"They should leave Afghanistan rather than disrespecting our religion, our faith," Mr Hakim said. "They have to leave and if next time they disrespect our religion, we will defend our holy Koran, religion and faith until the last drop of blood has left in our body."

Later, however, the protesters ended the rally and said they would send 20 representatives from the group to Kabul to talk with Afghan parliamentarians and demanded a meeting with President Hamid Karzai, Mr Rahimi said.

In a statement, Gen Allen offered his apologies to the president and people of Afghanistan and thanked the local Afghans "who helped us identify the error, and who worked with us to immediately take corrective action."

"We are thoroughly investigating the incident and are taking steps to ensure this does not ever happen again," Gen Allen said. "I assure you, I promise you, this was not intentional in any way."

The governor's office in Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan called the incident a "shameful move by some stupid individuals."

Zia Ul Rahman, deputy provincial police chief, said between 2,000 and 2,500 protesters demonstrated at the base.

"The people are very angry. The mood is very negative," Rahman said while the rally was going on. "Some are firing hunting guns in the air, but there have been no casualties."

Police said a similar protest just east of Kabul ended peacefully.

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