DNA evidence in Amanda Knox trial was flawed, court told

Investigators who collected the genetic evidence used to convict Amanda Knox of the murder of British student Meredith Kercher made glaring errors, including using a dirty glove and not wearing caps, independent forensic experts said yesterday.

The two experts were appointed by an Italian appeals court to review evidence used in Knox's trial, including DNA found on a kitchen knife believed to be the murder weapon and on the clasp of the victim's bra. That evidence played a crucial role in securing the convictions of Knox, an American student, and co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito in the 2007 murder of Ms Kercher, with whom Knox shared an apartment in the city of Perugia.

Knox, 24, and Sollecito, 27, have denied wrongdoing and have appealed. The evidence review was granted at the request of their defence teams.

In the first trial, prosecutors said Knox's DNA was found on the handle of the knife and Ms Kercher's DNA was found on the blade. They say Sollecito's DNA was found on Ms Kercher's bra.

But the independent experts told the court that the collection of evidence fell below international standards and may have resulted in contamination. AP

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