Police face trial for Genoa riot abuse

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The Independent Online

Forty-five Italians, mostly police and carabinieri officers, are to stand trial for the violent abuse of anti-globalisation protesters arrested at the G8 summit in Genoa in July 2001.

Forty-five Italians, mostly police and carabinieri officers, are to stand trial for the violent abuse of anti-globalisation protesters arrested at the G8 summit in Genoa in July 2001.

The protesters were taken to a camp at Bolzaneto, near Genoa. Amnesty International says of the 222 held, many were kicked, punched and spat on, verbally abused, and deprived of food, water and sleep for long periods.

Some were made to stand with their legs apart and faces against the wall for hours. Some said they were threatened with death, and some of the women with rape. They were forced to shout chants in praise of Mussolini and Chile's notorious former president Augusto Pinochet.

Among those charged is General Oronzo Doria, commander of penitentiary guards in Italy, who is accused of failing to prevent the abuse. He was promoted to his present position after being placed under investigation.

Also charged are the head of the medical staff at the camp, Giacomo Toccafondi, and four other doctors. Only one of those put under investigation, a policeman, was exonerated. The trial is to start on 12 October.

Francesco Caruso, of Disobbedienti, a non-violent anarchist group, said: "The urgent requirement is the removal or at least suspension of all officers charged."

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