Ukraine crisis: Fears of escalation after shell fired from Ukraine kills Russian citizen

Moscow promises ‘irreversible consequences’ after shell fired from Ukraine kills the first Russian citizen in the conflict. Kiev blames rebel fighters trying to draw Kremlin into attack. Anton Zverev reports from Donetsk

Donetsk

Russia threatened Ukraine on Sunday with “irreversible consequences” after a man was killed by a shell fired across the border from Ukraine, an incident Moscow described as aggression that must be met with a response – raising the threat of further Russian intervention in the crisis within the country.

Although both sides have reported cross-border shootings in the past, it appears to be the first time Moscow has reported fatalities on its side of the border in the three-month conflict which has killed hundreds of people in Ukraine.

Kiev called the accusation that its forces had fired across the border “total nonsense” and suggested the attack could have been the work of rebels trying to provoke Moscow to intervene on their behalf. The rebels denied they were responsible.

Inside Ukraine, combat has intensified dramatically since a rebel missile attack that killed dozens of government troops on Friday. Local officials said on Sunday that at least 18 people were killed in shooting incidents in the two main rebel-held cities. Russia’s Interfax news agency said fierce fighting had broken out on the outskirts of rebel-controlled Luhansk, a city near the border with Russia, and the Ukrainian army had attacked with a force of 70 tanks.

 

Kiev said it had bombarded a convoy of 100 armoured vehicles and trucks that had crossed into Ukraine carrying in rebel fighters from Russia. It also said seven of its troops had been killed in attacks.

Moscow’s bellicose response to the cross-border shelling raises the renewed prospect of overt Russian intervention after weeks in which President Vladimir Putin had appeared intent on disengaging, pulling back tens of thousands of troops he had massed at the frontier. Russia sent Ukraine a note of protest describing the incident as “an aggressive act by the Ukrainian side against sovereign Russian territory and the citizens of the Russian Federation”, the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement warning of “irreversible consequences”. “This represents a qualitative escalation of the danger to our citizens, now even on our own territory. Of course this naturally cannot pass without a response,” the Russian Deputy Foreign Minister , Grigory Karasin, told Rossiya-24 state television.

A pro-Russian rebel holds flowers, a gift from local residents, in Donetsk, where despite the smiles and laughter on show, tensions and violence escalated over the weekend A pro-Russian rebel holds flowers, a gift from local residents, in Donetsk, where despite the smiles and laughter on show, tensions and violence escalated over the weekend Russia’s Investigative Committee said a shell had landed in the yard of a house in a small town on the Russian side of the frontier, killing a man and wounding a woman. The Russian town is called Donetsk, sharing the name of the Ukrainian city of one million people that the rebels have declared capital of an independent “people’s republic”.

Andriy Lysenko, the spokesman for Ukraine’s National Security and Defence Council, said reports that Ukrainian forces were responsible were “total nonsense and the information is untrue”.

“The forces of the anti-terrorist operation do not fire on the territory of a neighbouring country and they do not fire on residential areas,” he said. “We have many examples of terrorists carrying out provocation shooting, including into Russian territory, and then accusing Ukrainian forces of it.”

Putin had appeared intent on disengaging Putin had appeared intent on disengaging The rebels denied blame. Interfax news agency quoted the rebels’ self-proclaimed first deputy prime minister, Andrey Prugin, as saying he was “90 per cent certain” it was Ukrainian troops that had fired across the border, because the rebels were short on ammunition and cautious about where they fired.

The conflict in eastern Ukraine erupted in April when armed pro-Russian fighters seized towns and government buildings, weeks after Russia annexed Ukraine’s Crimea peninsula in response to the overthrow of a pro-Moscow president in Kiev.

The fighting has escalated sharply in recent days after Ukrainian forces pushed the rebels out of their most heavily fortified bastion, the town of Slovyansk.

Hundreds of rebels, led by a self-proclaimed defence minister from Moscow, have retreated to the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, built reinforcements and pledged to make a stand. The once-bustling city has been emptying in fear of a battle.

On the streets there are fewer and fewer cars. Some drivers no longer bother to stop at red lights since there are no police around and few vehicles.

Rebel fighters vowed to fight to the end if the army comes.

Kiev says Moscow has provoked the rebellion and allowed fighters and heavy weapons to cross the border with impunity. It has struggled to reassert control over the eastern frontier, recapturing border positions from rebels.

The past two days have seen an escalation in retaliation after dozens of Ukrainian troops were killed in a rocket attack on a base near the border on Friday. Kiev said it killed hundreds of rebels in air strikes on Saturday, although there was no independent confirmation of such high casualties and the rebels denied suffering serious losses.

The result of the fighting can be seen The result of the fighting can be seen Mr Lysenko, the Ukrainian security spokesman, said yesterday that forces had used artillery to strike a convoy of about 100 armoured vehicles and trucks after confirming that the convoy was carrying “a large number of recruits” into Ukraine from Russia.

He said at least seven Ukrainian service members had died in attacks in the east in the past day.

In Kiev, President Petro Poroshenko’s office said he had turned down an invitation to attend the World Cup football final in Brazil because of the situation in Ukraine.

REUTERS

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