Indian police beat leader of Hindu zealots

INDIAN POLICE fired water cannons and tear-gas and used clubs to break up an anti-government rally in Delhi yesterday by throngs of Hindu militants. Government officials had banned the rally, claiming that it might inflame discontent between Hindus and Muslims around the country, and thousands of arrests were made yesterday to avert any religious unrest.

More than 500 supporters of the right-wing Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) were injured in skirmishes yesterday with the 70,000 security forces who had sealed off the centre of Delhi.

Among the injured was Murli Manohar Joshi, 63, the party's president. Just as Mr Joshi finished declaring that the state's repression was far worse than the British Raj's he was sprayed at close range by a water-cannon. Then he was tear-gassed. Choking, he fell under a stampede of police who charged MPs in his contingent with bamboo staves. Hospital sources said his condition was 'serious but stable'.

Lal Krishna Advani, the BJP's parliamentary leader, accused the police of using 'unprecedented atrocities' to disperse the Hindu militants. But despite Mr Advani's criticism, Delhi police reacted with untypical restraint: they did not shoot anyone. Mr Advani, along with Atal Behari Vajpayee and other senior BJP politicians, was among the 4,000 arrested in Delhi. Police are expected to release them today.

The rally was a bare-knuckle test of strength between the Congress government of the Prime Minister, Narasimha Rao, and Hindu revivalists who staged the rally in an attempt to topple him. In that attempt the BJP failed. The Prime Minister is sitting more comfortably than he was 24 hours ago, when it seemed that even after arresting more than 100,000 zealots around the country the Hindu saffron brigade were still pouring into Delhi.

It is the 'marriage season', and many Hindu militants argued their way past police checks on roads and in trains by showing bogus wedding invitations. Out of all the hordes of Hindu zealots who set out for Delhi only one un- named youth managed to hurdle the barbed-wire barricades and sprint to the rally site before he was grabbed by police.

Although a police spokesman said that by nightfall control was restored in Delhi with 'minimal use of force', it was the BJP that enforced order and discipline among the protesters. The BJP cadres, backed by members of the RSS, a neo-fascist Hindu cultural organisation, kept the protesters from attacking the city's Muslim neighbourhoods.

Even when police hit demonstrators with bamboo staves and fired tear-gas into the narrow lanes where knots of Hindu militants shouted 'Lord Ram] Lord Ram]' the protesters refrained from attacking the police. One retired bureaucrat and BJP supporter, S K Bagga, said: 'I told the police to arrest me. They said we can't, all the jails - even the football stadiums - are full. There's no room.'

The bureaucrat was lucky. Bored by the Gandhi-like tactics of the demonstrators, the police near the New Delhi Railway Station obliged by hauling them away in city buses, but only for 200 yards. Then the Hindu militants were let out of the bus, one by one, and made to run a gauntlet of riot police swinging clubs. Yet there were odd moments of civility. A police officer beat an old man so hard he staggered and collapsed, shattering a pile of clay jugs. Then the policeman apologised and retrieved the old man's spectacles, lying among the clay shards.

Before his arrest, Mr Advani said: 'The rally was a success even before it started, and we can thank the government's over-reaction for that.' Once Mr Advani and 17 other arrested BJP MPs are released they will renew their attacks on Mr Rao's beleaguered government with an 'anti-repression day'. Hindu militants are planning a day of strikes and protest meetings, even though this will surely lead to more clashes. The Congress government has temporarily banned all political party rallies, even its own, in an effort to cool political and communal tensions.

The upsurge in Hindu revivalism, led by the BJP, has flummoxed the Congress party, which has traditionally been the most powerful in India. The BJP's brand of religious politics - with its implicit anti-Muslim sentiment - has been denounced by Congress and left-wing parties, since there are more than 120 million Muslims scattered throughout the country. One weapon used by secularists against the BJP may be as dangerous as religion, and that is caste.

The BJP draws its support from the upper-caste Brahmins, the clerks and the small shopkeepers, but it widened its appeal to many other Hindus by tearing down a disputed mosque in Ayodhya in December. Over the next few months, the Congress and left- wing parties may try to cleave the Hindu revivalists' support by shaking up the thousand-year-old caste hierarchy.

(Photograph omitted)

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Arts and Entertainment
Ramsay Bolton in Game of Thrones
tvSeries 5, Episode 3 review
News
peoplePair enliven the Emirates bore-draw
Arts and Entertainment
tv
News
Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband (R) and Boris Johnson, mayor of London, talk on the Andrew Marr show in London April 26
General electionAndrew Marr forced to intervene as Boris and Miliband clash on TV
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Ashdown Group: Senior Accounts Assistant - Accounts Payable - St. Albans

£26000 - £28000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: Senior Accounts Assistan...

Ashdown Group: Treasury Assistant - Accounts Assistant - London, Old Street

£24000 - £26000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: A highly successful, glo...

Recruitment Genius: Installation and Service / Security Engineer

£22000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company is part of a Group...

Recruitment Genius: Service Charge Accounts Assistant

£16000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Are you a a young, dynamic pers...

Day In a Page

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence