Iraqi insurgents kill 22 in slaughter at bakery and mosque

A SUICIDE bomber driving a truck loaded with vegetables killed 13 Shias in a town north-east of Baghdad yesterday. And gunmen chanting religious slogans shot dead nine people in a bakery in a Shia district of Baghdad in the latest upsurge of sectarian killings that have continued despite the Iraqi elections.

Insurgents, mostly fanatical Sunni Muslims, are showing that they are prepared to slaughter mercilessly Shias and anybody connected with the interim Iraqi government or the US occupation.

The bomb outside a Shia mosque in Balad Ruz, 45 miles north-east of Baghdad, was designed to kill worshippers as they left Friday prayers. Locals had suspected that there was something suspicious about a pick- up truck loaded with vegetables, said police Colonel Tahseen Mohammed. As Iraqi troops approached, the truck exploded, killing 13 and wounding a similar number.

Sectarian attacks by fundamentalist Sunni fighters, whom Iraqis refer to as Salafi or Wahhabi, have been expected during the lead-up to the Shia feast of Ashura commemorating the martyrdom of Imam Hussein in 680AD. Suicide bombers among the Ashura crowds in Baghdad and Karbala killed 171 people last year. The borders of Iraq are to be shut next week but this is unlikely to stop the bombers.

The attack on the Shia bakery in the district known as New Baghdad appears to have also been sectarian. Two car-loads of masked gunmen burst into the bakery shouting "Allahu Akbar" (God is Greatest) as they sprayed the workers with machine-gun fire, killing nine of them. The white walls of the room where they died were left covered with blood-smeared posters of Shia clerics.

Earlier in the week, fighters killed four policemen and 20 truck drivers who had been captured when a convoy was attacked. It was carrying sugar for the Ministry of Trade to government warehouses in Baghdad. The rotting bodies of the dead men, which nobody dared to touch for two days, were found near Salman Pak, 12 miles south-east of Baghdad.

Insurgents stormed the police station at Salman Pak yesterday. They were only dislodged when US helicopter gunships arrived; 10 policemen and 20 insurgents were killed.

One of the main roads from Baghdad to Basra, Iraq's second city, passes through Salman Pak. Several Sunni tribes who adhere to the Wahhabi version of Islam prey on traffic using the road. On election day on 30 January they stopped cars. If the fingers of drivers or passengers were marked with the blue ink used to show that a person had voted, the insurgents chopped off the finger.

Donald Rumsfeld, the US Defence Secretary, arrived on an unannounced visit to US troops in the northern city of Mosul yesterday. He said it would take time for Iraqi security forces to crush the insurgency. He said the election had been a good day for Iraq "but there are still challenges ahead".

The US and the interim government have claimed that the election marked a turning point in Iraq. So far there is little sign of this. Iraq's Electoral Commission is still checking ballot boxes and some politicians say that the enthusiasm generated by the election is ebbing because of the delay. But the outcome is already clear. The Shia coalition, the United Iraqi Alliance, has a commanding lead, followed by the Kurds and, in third place, the Iraqi List led by Iyad Allawi, the interim Prime Minister. None of the other parties will win more than a few seats in the 275-member national assembly.

The election, with the Shias voting en mass and the Sunni Arabs largely abstaining, has deepened the sectarian divide. Among the insurgents, though militarily the most effective are former security men, soldiers and Baathists, it is the Sunni religious fundamentalists who have growing influence. Many of these view Shias as infidels.

The US is continuing to stress that it aims to hand over security duties to rapidly trained Iraqi army units. This has been tried repeatedly by the US military over the past 18 months but with a signal lack of success. Where US soldiers have withdrawn or taken a back seat the result has usually been a power vacuum which has swiftly been filled by resistance fighters.

Interior ministry officials say their officers do not like a US plan to leave US trainers in Iraqi units. Iraqis working with the US Army fear being tagged as collaborators.

Almost two years since the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in April 2003, the resistance has partial or total control over all the main roads into Baghdad.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Parts Advisor

£16500 - £18500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: One of the leading Mercedes-Ben...

Recruitment Genius: Software Developer

£27500 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Telemarketers / Sales - Home Based - OTE £23,500

£19500 - £23500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Experienced B2B Telemarketer wa...

Recruitment Genius: Showroom Assistant

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This global company are looking for two Showro...

Day In a Page

Fifa corruption: The 161-page dossier that exposes the organisation's dark heart

The 161-page dossier that exposes Fifa's dark heart

How did a group of corrupt officials turn football’s governing body into what was, in essence, a criminal enterprise? Chris Green and David Connett reveal all
Mediterranean migrant crisis: 'If Europe thinks bombing boats will stop smuggling, it will not. We will defend ourselves,' says Tripoli PM

Exclusive interview with Tripoli PM Khalifa al-Ghweil

'If Europe thinks bombing boats will stop smuggling, it will not. We will defend ourselves'
Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles: How the author foretold the Californian water crisis

Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles

How the author foretold the Californian water crisis
Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison as authorities crackdown on dissent in the arts

Art attack

Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison
Marc Jacobs is putting Cher in the limelight as the face of his latest campaign

Cher is the new face of Marc Jacobs

Alexander Fury explains why designers are turning to august stars to front their lines
Parents of six-year-old who beat leukaemia plan to climb Ben Nevis for cancer charity

'I'm climbing Ben Nevis for my daughter'

Karen Attwood's young daughter Yasmin beat cancer. Now her family is about to take on a new challenge - scaling Ben Nevis to help other children
10 best wedding gift ideas

It's that time of year again... 10 best wedding gift ideas

Forget that fancy toaster, we've gone off-list to find memorable gifts that will last a lifetime
Paul Scholes column: With the Premier League over for another year, here are my end of season awards

Paul Scholes column

With the Premier League over for another year, here are my end of season awards
Heysel disaster 30th anniversary: Liverpool have seen too much tragedy to forget fateful day in Belgium

Liverpool have seen too much tragedy to forget Heysel

Thirty years ago, 39 fans waiting to watch a European Cup final died as a result of a fatal cocktail of circumstances. Ian Herbert looks at how a club dealt with this tragedy
Amir Khan vs Chris Algieri: Khan’s audition for Floyd Mayweather may turn into a no-win situation, says Frank Warren

Khan’s audition for Mayweather may turn into a no-win situation

The Bolton fighter could be damned if he dazzles and damned if he doesn’t against Algieri, the man last seen being decked six times by Pacquiao, says Frank Warren
Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor