Assad's forces attack opposition on fronts across Syria

 

Syrian government forces
attacked opponents of President Bashar al-Assad on several fronts today, sending residents fleeing from one town near the capital and
bombarding the city of Homs for an 11th day running, activists said.

Citizens of Homs - Syria's third largest city with one million people - faced a humanitarian crisis. Food and fuel were scarce and most shops shut due to relentless shelling and rocket fire that have trapped people in their homes.

With Assad seemingly oblivious to international condemnation of the tactics employed to crush the uprising against his 11-year rule, Arab countries led by Saudi Arabia pushed for a new resolution at the United Nations supporting their peace plan.

The redoubled diplomatic effort came as the UN human rights chief chastised the Security Council for failing to act on Syria, saying Assad had been emboldened by its failure to condemn him.

"I am particularly appalled by the ongoing onslaught on Homs ... According to credible accounts, the Syrian army has shelled densely populated neighbourhoods of Homs in what appears to be an indiscriminate attack on civilian areas," UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said in a speech to the General Assembly in New York yesterday.

The Russian- and Iranian-backed Assad, whose Alawite-minority family has ruled the mainly Sunni Muslim country for 42 years, is struggling to put down street demonstrations and stop insurgent attacks across the country.

He dismisses his opponents as terrorists backed by enemy nations in a regional power-play and says he will introduce reforms on his own terms.

Conflict flared anew today in Rankous, a country town near the capital Damascus that was hit by government shelling. Activist Ibn Al-Kalmoun, reached by Skype from Beirut, said phone lines had been cut and many residents had fled.

In Homs, a city in western Syria at the heart of the 11-month-old uprising, the pro-opposition neighbourhood of Baba Amro was struck at dawn by the heaviest shelling in five days, the Syria Observatory for Human Rights said.

Activist Hussein Nader said it was not possible to go to the streets to survey the damage or look for casualties.

"They are hitting the same spots several consecutive times, making venturing out there impossible. The shelling was heavy in the morning and now it is one rocket every 15 minutes or so," Hussein said by satellite phone.

"Residents are trapped. We have a man who sustained severe burns and is dying and he needs a hospital."

The man was in a truck picking up wounded people in Baba Amro overnight when it was hit by rocket fire, he said.

Mohammad al-Mohammad, a doctor at a makeshift hospital in Baba Amro, appeared in a video with a wounded youth he said was shot by sniper in his side.

"The bullet ended up in the stomach. This is a critical condition that needs transportation to a proper hospital," Mohammad said. "We appeal to anyone with conscience to intervene to stop the massacres of Bashar al-Assad and his cohorts."

Food and fuel prices had tripled and gangs were looting houses, activists said.

Mohammad al-Homsi said the situation was getting worse.

"Army roadblocks are increasing around opposition districts. There is a pattern to the bombardment now. It is heavy in the morning, then gives way to an afternoon lull and resumes at night," Homsi said from the city.

"Shells are falling at random, almost everyone in a residential building in Baba Amro has moved to the ground floor. It is normal to find up to six families living together on the lower levels," activist Hussein Nader said by phone from Homs.

Shelling was also reported in the town of Rastan early today.

Foreign media have had to rely on activists' accounts of the situation because the Syrian government restricts access, although reports from neutral organisations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and Human Rights Watch confirm the general picture of widespread violence.

Reuters

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