New Orleans vote swayed by leaflet fiasco: Patrick Cockburn on an alleged votes scam that shocked a crime-hardened city

IT IS NOT easy to shock the electorate of New Orleans, probably the most corrupt city in America, but dirty tricks used in the mayoral election just passed came close. Even the most cynical local observers admitted surprise when Donald Mintz, running as the candidate who would clean up the city, was accused of distributing viciously anti- Semitic and racist leaflets attacking himself.

On election day on Saturday Mr Mintz saw thousands of voters desert him in disgust, ensuring that New Orleans, unlike Los Angeles and New York last year, did not replace a black with a white mayor. Mr Mintz's own political career is probably over.

The scandal first broke on 31 January when a worker in the Mintz campaign by the name of Napolean Moses was identified by police investigators as he handed over a bundle of leaflets and dollars 600 ( pounds 400) to a distributor in a deserted car park at 3am. One entitled 'Just Vote No' accused Mr Mintz of being a Jewish elitist who should not be allowed to 'lead a majority black city'.

Marc Morial, Mr Mintz's 36-year- old opponent and son of the city's first black mayor, says the leaflets were an attempt to discredit him. Mr Mintz, a neatly dressed 50-year- old lawyer with a somewhat glacial personality, denies knowing anything about them. But his campaign admits that it had raised dollars 200,000 by sending this and other anti-Semitic leaflets to potential Jewish contributors outside Louisiana.

Forging leaflets in order to sabotage an opponent is not unknown in Louisiana. But many of them were very crude appeals to racial hatred. One of the worst, entitled 'Let's make Mintz meat and molasses' states that 'Jews have a gutter-ditch religion, sacrificing animals and Anglo-children in rituals'. A neutral commission decided that at least two of the leaflets had come from inside the Mintz campaign.

The leaflet affair is now seen as the turning point of the election. Some 59 per cent of the electorate in New Orleans is black, but older blacks, disillusioned with the scandal-ridden administration of the current black mayor, Sydney Barthelemy, and distrustful of Mr Morial's youth, were inclining towards Mr Mintz. Susan Howell, a pollster at New Orleans University, says: 'If the election had been held two weeks ago, Mintz would have won. The leaflets robbed him of momentum at a crucial moment.'

This was borne out by this weekend's elections. Mr Morial, an eloquent and effective politician, won 54 per cent of the vote, but an exit poll showed that 46 per cent of his supporters said they were deeply influenced by the leaflet controversy. As the white candidate Mr Mintz could only win if he convinced enough blacks that he was different from the corrupt demagogues of the past. He may have been on the verge of success when the scandal struck.

The fact that Mr Mintz stood a chance of winning is a measure of the sense of desperation in New Orleans. An attractive but run-down city, its 495,000 people depend on the tourists who visit the restaurants of the old French quarter and the swamps of the Mississippi delta. It also has a well-earned reputation for violence, with the murder rate running at more than one a day this year and a total of 1,569 murders since 1989. Sergeant Barry Fletcher of the New Orleans police says: 'There was an immediate increase in violence when cocaine first came to the city in 1986 and 90 per cent of killings are drug-related.'

New Orleans has all the problems of other American cities but in an extreme form because it is poorer and more corrupt. Carl Galmon, who counsels black teenagers in trouble with the law at the Urban League, says: 'Unemployment among youth is over 40 per cent. The army used to be the one place they could get a job but now they are slimming down.' In the last days of his campaign Marc Morial told a group of young black students that 'we need less Uzis and more books'. The real problem is not education but the loss of jobs in the docks and heavy industry.

Sergeant Fletcher says the police had a brief success in cutting the murder rate by aggressive patrols that forced crack dealers off the streets, but they had to stop because of political pressure. A local civil rights lawyer said these sweeps were for political show and the queues outside crack houses often stretch out to the street without the police interfering. A drug wholesaler in two public housing projects reputedly estimated his monthly income at dollars 1.1m, of which he paid the police dollars 50,000.

Tolerance of corruption, extreme violence and poverty make Louisiana feel like a piece of Latin America that has unaccountably drifted north across the Caribbean. No other state has such blatant corruption. When the governor, Edwin Edwards, defeated the former Nazi, David Duke, in the 1991 election his supporters, recalling that Mr Edwards had stood trial for bribery, produced a bumper sticker saying: 'Vote for the Crook. It's important.' In 1989 in New Orleans a whistle-blower, who revealed that some 300 bars controlled by the mob were not paying sales tax, was simply strangled.

Does it matter who runs New Orleans? Richer and better managed cities have been unable to stop their economies withering as better-off whites and businesses move to the suburbs. Last week the city council finally agreed to a plan to build the world's largest casino beside the French Quarter, but most of the profits will go to the state. In the past most reformers have either been bought off or isolated by the local political elite, who do not want change. It is a measure of the corruption in Louisiana that Mr Mintz - by all accounts an honest if ambitious man - or somebody in his campaign should have thought the only way for a reformer to get elected was to set up his own dirty tricks department.

(Graphic omitted)

News
peopleHowards' Way actress, and former mistress of Jeffrey Archer, was 60
Sport
Romelu Lukaku puts pen to paper
sport
News
Robyn Lawley
people
Arts and Entertainment
Unhappy days: Resistance spy turned Nobel prize winner Samuel Beckett
books
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
News
people
Life and Style
Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson voice the show’s heroes
gamingOnce stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover
News
i100
Life and Style
Phones will be able to monitor your health, from blood pressure to heart rate, and even book a doctor’s appointment for you
techCould our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?
News
people
Extras
indybest
Travel
Ryan taming: the Celtic Tiger carrier has been trying to improve its image
travelRyanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?
Sport
Usain Bolt confirms he will run in both the heats and the finals of the men's relay at the Commonwealth Games
commonwealth games
Life and Style
Slim pickings: Spanx premium denim collection
fashionBillionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers 'thigh-trimming construction'
News
Sabina Altynbekova has said she wants to be famous for playing volleyball, not her looks
people
News
i100
Life and Style
tech'World's first man-made leaves' could use photosynthesis to help astronauts breathe
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

SAP Project Manager

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: SAP PROJECT MANAGER - 3 MONTHS - BERKSHI...

SAP Project Manager

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: SAP PROJECT MANAGER - 3 MONTHS - BERKSHI...

Senior Investment Accounting Change Manager

£600 - £700 per day + competitive: Orgtel: Senior Investment Accounting Change...

Microsoft Dynamics AX Functional Consultant

£65000 - £75000 per annum + benefits: Progressive Recruitment: A rare opportun...

Day In a Page

Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star