G8 Summit: The Gleneagles agenda

The issue: The G8 will be looking for progress to tackle global warming after Kyoto expires in 2012. It will need to reverse the rise in carbon emissions in the northern hemisphere and reduce reliance on fossil fuels.

The likely sticking points: America favours investment in nuclear and new technologies. Other countries see the need for further curbs on carbon emissions twinned with clean technology, including renewable energy, such as wind power.

The likely outcome: France, Germany, the UK and Russia are confident of a breakthrough but Mr Bush says he will not support a new Kyoto-style agreement. The G8 may have to settle on a "talking shop" forum for industrialised countries.

Trade

The issue: Helping African nations to trade their way out of poverty will be an important issue at the G8. Trade barriers are blocking African goods, and farm subsidies in the US and EU make it difficult for third-world farmers to compete.

The likely sticking points: The US says it will scrap subsidies for its farmers if the EU does this first. Since M.Chirac has in effect blocked movement on CAP reform, an impasse is on the cards. Tony Blair called last week for the CAP to be abolished.

The likely outcome: Wholesale scrapping of trade barriers or farmers' subsidies in the West is a practical impossibility. But there may be some progress here, and possibly the establishment of new targets to help African farmers.

Debt relief

The issue: African nations are strangled by £170bn of debt incurred by previous regimes. Campaigners want the debt cancelled to enable the governments to invest in health and education, rather than interest payments.

The likely sticking points: Gordon Brown says he has already secured a £25bn deal to write off debt for the poorest African countries, and is after a deal to wipe out debt for other countries. President Bush will not support such an aid deal.

The likely outcome: Deal likely to be struck but some Third World charities will be disappointed unless at least 62 poor countries, instead of 19, benefit from debt relief.

Aid

The issue: A massive aid package for African nations is a key demand of anti-poverty campaigners, bolstered by the Live8 concert. They want $50bn (£28bn) of new aid to poor countries immediately - including Africa.

The likely sticking points: Rich countries are reluctant to provide extra cash without guarantees of good governance so aid does not disappear into the coffers of corrupt regimes. The UK is convinced of the case for more aid but the US is less so.

The likely outcome: Expected to commit $25bn in aid to Africa over five years, less than 0.01 per cent of the combined economic wealth of the richest donors. Oxfam said 55 million children could die if the money is not made available immediately.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Customer Service / Receptionist

£14000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Administrator - Legal Department

£19000 - £19665 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Are you looking to join an awar...

Recruitment Genius: IT Infrastructure Engineer

£30000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Our client is looking to find a...

Recruitment Genius: Technical Manager / Technical Executive

£25000 - £45000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An exciting opportunity exists ...

Day In a Page

The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss