Republican upset in deep south poll

THE RESULT of the Alabama straw poll was such a surprise that it left state dignitaries smiling at their Southern "difference" and sent reporters scurrying to rewrite their headlines. While George W Bush confirmed his standing as front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination in Iowa two weeks ago, he did less well when Alabama Republicans delivered their verdict this weekend in the first poll of its kind to be held in the South.

Birmingham, Alabama, a sprawling industrial city once known for steel and violent racial conflicts, is the very antithesis of Ames, the farm- belt college town that stages the Iowa straw poll. Where Ames had verdant fields and spacious marquees bursting with free sustenance, Alabama's Republicans thronged into the baking concrete of the brutalist civic centre, where the coffee and fries - which they had to pay for - soon ran out.

And where Ames had a full slate of candidates - bar the maverick Senator John McCain - all of them intent on throwing their dollars at an election more than a year away, Birmingham had but two national candidates: the black preacher and popular television show host, Alan Keyes, and Orrin Hatch, the long-time Utah Senator, who had distinguished himself a year before by trying to persuade President Clinton to admit his sins with Monica Lewinsky to avoid impeachment months before he was forced to confess.

Birmingham also had Angel Rocker, a local black activist and self-help advocate, who drew much applause and laughter, but polled only six votes. The other candidates all stayed away. They were either on holiday or campaigning elsewhere. Mr Bush was in the next state, Georgia, but did not deign to make the slight diversion from his plans. "This was never for the media or the candidates, it was for the Alabama Republicans," said the party chairman, Winton Blount, who professed himself delighted with the 3,000- strong turnout. It was, the organisers said, the biggest gathering of Republicans ever in the state.

The stars may not have graced the Birmingham civic centre, but Alabama's Republicans did their level best. They opened proceedings with a street parade, complete with band, cheerleaders and four real live elephants, trucked in from a circus in Illinois, which stood benignly to greet participants as they arrived, and then give rides to their children. The city's police, equipped with bicycle helmets against any elephant indiscipline, looked on warily.

Inside the hall, there was all the paraphernalia of the political rally. A (white) jazz bandplayed "Happy days are here again" at key moments and stalls sold the jokey political junk at which America excels. Sweatshirts with a Clinton profile and the legend: "So many interns; so little time." Little bottles of "Monica mouthwash" to "gargle away the DNA". Baby's bibs inscribed: "Future Republican President", and car bumper stickers: "Kevorkian for White House physician" (after the now-jailed euthanasia advocate). And brooches, scarves, T-shirts, bags, everything with the Republicans' elephant motif.

This was an almost exclusively white gathering; black Republicans are few and far between in the Republican Party anywhere and in the South they are still fewer. But the few blacks there were, several of them en famille, and decked out in American flags, socialised easily with the rest. Sherrill Williams, a self-employed financial analyst who had driven 200 miles from the small town in the south-east of the state said he had been welcomed. "The Republican Party represents my priorities," he said.

If the organisers were content, many participants were disappointed that Mr Bush and the rest had not shown up in a state that sees itself as the "bell-wether of the South".

The system of presidential primaries, which begins in Iowa and New Hampshire, skews the selection process in favour of the north and east, even though the political and economic clout of the South has grown exponentially in the past decade.

The Republican Party in the South has advanced at the same time. The Alabama straw poll was a first attempt to claim more influence for the South, and - enthusiastic participants insisted - certainly not the last. A hall that had listened attentively to the three candidates who were present and lauded their oratory, sustained its defiance.

Those who voted at Birmingham rewarded their two national guests. Mr Keyes, the black fundamentalist, topped the poll; his overwhelmingly white audience, as Pam Ward, a delegate, said, "liked his message and the way he delivered it". Mr Hatch came second, pushing Mr Bush unexpectedly into third place. It was, said Mr Blount, "a vote of Southern courtesy, a vote that said thank-you for showing up". But it was also a warning, however mild, that the South's voters cannot be taken for granted.

Alabama Results

Alan Keyes: TV talk show host and fundamentalist preacher - 500 votes

Orrin Hatch: Upright Mormon and presidential aspirant who takes his politics seriously - 458

George W Bush: Front-running centrist, damned by his absence and equivocation - 421

Gary Bauer: Moral majority with the moralism toned down - 124

Elizabeth Dole: Political wife tapping the women's vote - 71

Steve Forbes: Billionaire publisher out to "buy" the presidency - 43

Pat Buchanan: TV debater and right-winger wavering about leaving the party - 42

Dan Quayle: Bush snr's vice-president, damned by his spelling gaffe - 22

Angel Rocker: Local black activist trying to join the mainstream - 6

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Arts and Entertainment
Joe Cocker performing on the Stravinski hall stage during the Montreux Jazz Festival, in Montreux, Switzerland in 2002
musicHe 'turned my song into an anthem', says former Beatle
News
Clarke Carlisle
sport
Sport
footballStoke City vs Chelsea match report
Arts and Entertainment
theatreThe US stars who've taken to UK panto, from Hasselhoff to Hall
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Life and Style
Approaching sale shopping in a smart way means that you’ll get the most out of your money
life + styleSales shopping tips and tricks from the experts
News
newsIt was due to be auctioned off for charity
News
Coca-Cola has become one of the largest companies in the world to push staff towards switching off their voicemails, in a move intended to streamline operations and boost productivity
peopleCoca-Cola staff urged to switch it off to boost productivity
Environment
Sir David Attenborough
environment... as well as a plant and a spider
Voices
'That's the legal bit done. Now on to the ceremony!'
voicesThe fight for marriage equality isn't over yet, says Siobhan Fenton
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Regulatory / Compliance / Exeter

Excellent Salary: Austen Lloyd: Exeter - An excellent opportunity for a Solici...

Ashdown Group: IT Support Technician - 12 Month Fixed Term - Shrewsbury

£17000 - £20000 per annum: Ashdown Group: IT Helpdesk Support Technician - 12 ...

The Jenrick Group: Maintenance Planner

£28000 - £32000 per annum + pension + holidays: The Jenrick Group: Maintenance...

The Jenrick Group: World Wide PLC Service Engineer

£30000 - £38000 per annum + pesion + holidays: The Jenrick Group: World Wide S...

Day In a Page

Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there