Skyscraper city dreads high-rise rents

Cost of living in New York set to soar, reports David Usborne

New York - To scurrying Manhattanites sex and money are important, but their biggest obsession is where they live. Have they found a place to rent? Is the neighbourhood right - below 96th Street anyway? And did they get a deal?

Understand that and you will understand the tizzy gripping the city over negotiations under way in Albany, the state capital, on the fate of rent control laws that date back five decades. Are these nigh-sacred limits, which apply to about 2 million New Yorkers, about to be killed off?

It seems so, although perhaps not overnight. But, unquestionably, the process spells a revolution, the likely impact of which is being hotly debated.

It may bring sanity to a wildly distorted housing market; but it could also drive out from the Apple many who could find themselves unable to stay - including the artists, writers and entertainers that give the city its rich mix.

Introduced during the Second World War to protect tenants from greedy landlords exploiting a housing shortage, the controls have since earned a certain infamy for helping the wealthy far more than they do the city's poor.

There was the case, for instance, of Mia Farrow's sprawling 11-room apartment overlooking Central Park for which she used to pay a piddling $2,300 a month.

Farrow has since moved on (driven to Connecticut after her break-up with Woody Allen). But there are still myriad examples of young professionals enjoying rents far below fair market rates - brokers, lawyers and even an occasional British broadcaster. Alistair Cooke, of Letter from America fame, pays $2,078 a month for his rent-controlled park-view pad on Fifth Avenue.

The control system applies to about a third of New York's rental units.

In essence, it allows the state to decide by how much a landlord can raise the rent (usually hardly at all) and guarantees every resident tenure for his or her life and beyond to the lives of their children. If the curbs were lifted, rents in parts of Manhattan would rise by at least a third.

Economists have long scorned the controls as a damaging anachronism - New York is meant, after all, to be the belly of the capitalist beast, not a last bastion of socialist regulation. They argue, for instance, that they have discouraged developers from building new housing in New York which has made a long-term shortage in the city has just got worse.

"Next to bombing," Assar Lindbeck, the Swedish economist once said, "rent control seems in many cases to be the most efficient technique so far known for destroying cities, as the housing situation in New York City demonstrates".

Landlords, naturally, would agree. Finally, with a realignment towards Republicans in Albany, they have found ears sympathetic to them. Joseph Bruno, the Senate leader, says he will block renewal of the laws when they expire on 15 June. In the lower Assembly, Speaker Sheldon Silver, a Democrat, insists they be renewed in toto.

Now New York Governor, George Pataki, is offering a compromise.

The effect will be to phase out controls, but more slowly. He suggests ending them now for the wealthiest tenants - anyone earning $175,000 or more - and liberating apartments from the controls when a tenant dies or moves out.

Whether his middle way will be followed soon enough to avoid a showdown next month, remains to be seen. In the meantime, all parties are edgy and unhappy. Tenants' groups, in particular, have condemned the Pataki proposals as Mr Bruno's in disguise.

The end of rent control would mean increases in apartment rents of up to 35 per cent in large swaths of Manhattan, including Greenwich Village, the Financial District and the Upper East and West Sides.

The prospect prompted Michael McKee, of the New York State Tenants and Neighbors Coalition, to warn: "If you want New York City to be a vibrant, diverse community, with artist and writers and creative people, then rent regulation is very important. Without rent regulation, creative people will be gone".

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + uncapped commission, Benefits, OTE £100k: SThree: ...

Guru Careers: Dining Room Head Chef

£32K: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Dining Room Head Chef to work for one of ...

Guru Careers: Pastry Sous Chef / Experienced Pastry Chef

£27K: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Pastry Sous Chef / Experienced Pastry Che...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + competitive: SThree: Are you a recent graduate loo...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine