Swedes' dilemma over bomb suspect

MARY DEJEVSKY

Paris

and agencies

Swedish police will decide today whether to charge the man arrested in connection with terrorist attacks in Paris with murder, setting the stage for him to be extradited to France.

Swedish security police yesterday confirmed they had detained a man in connection with two bombings in Paris, which killed seven people and wounded more than 100, the TT news agency said.

In Stockholm a police spokesman said that under Swedish law, chief prosecutor Jan Danielsson must decide today whether to go ahead with a prosecution. "Either he must find there is substance enough for a court hearing ... or he must be released," the spokesman said. Under Swedish law, a person suspected of a major offence can be extradited only after a court hearing and a formal arrest in Sweden.

Abdelkrim Deneche, a 40-year Algerian also known as Abdessabour, was still in custody last night after two days of questioning in connection with the Saint-Michel metro station bombing in Paris on 25 July. A top- level delegation of French police and judiciary officials, headed by Jean- Francois Ricard, the judge leading the investigation, had remained in Stockholm overnight, hoping to be allowed to interview him.

Meanwhile, more details emerged about Mr Deneche and the background to his arrest. According to a report in Le Monde yesterday, he moved to Stockholm in 1991 under Sweden's relatively generous provision for political refugees, after spending time in Pakistan, Afghanistan and pre-election Algeria.

He is said to have kept a low profile, but to have been a driving force, if not the founder, of a clandestine newsletter, Al Ansar (the partisans).

This is distributed at mosques throughout Europe and North Africa and is believed to be linked with the Armed Islamic Group (GIA), the most extreme of Algeria's fundamentalist organisations. It was here that one of the first claims of GIA responsibility for the Saint-Michel bomb appeared.

Although domiciled in Sweden, where he has a Swedish-born wife and two children, Mr Deneche is said to have left for France in 1993, where he frequented the colourful quarter of Barbes, on the edge of Montmartre. He reportedly lived in and around Rue Myrha, a street of mosques, Islamic bookshops, cheap hotels and teahouses - and the same street where Imam Sahraoui was murdered on 11 July.

After the Saint-Michel bombing, Mr Deneche was reportedly identified as a suspect by an off-duty gendarme from Brittany who was travelling in the seat opposite him in the train where the bomb was planted. The gendarme, who also identified another two suspects, is said to have selected Mr Deneche's photograph from a file shown to him by police and described him as appearing "agitated".

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Arts and Entertainment
British musician Mark Ronson arrives for the UK premiere of the film 'Mortdecai'
music
Voices
Winston Churchill, then prime minister, outside No 10 in June 1943
voicesA C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
News
i100
Sport
footballBrighton vs Arsenal match report
Arts and Entertainment
Benedict Cumberbatch has spoken about the lack of opportunities for black British actors in the UK
film
News
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Private Client Solicitor - Oxford

Excellent Salary : Austen Lloyd: OXFORD - REGIONAL FIRM - An excellent opportu...

Austen Lloyd: Clinical Negligence Associate / Partner - Bristol

Super Package: Austen Lloyd: BRISTOL - SENIOR CLINICAL NEGLIGENCE - An outstan...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Consultant - Solar Energy - OTE £50,000

£15000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Fantastic opportunities are ava...

Recruitment Genius: Compute Engineer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Compute Engineer is required to join a globa...

Day In a Page

Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us