Households can save $10,000 in 2010, says new book

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The Independent Online

A new book offers consumers ten ways to save themselves $10,000 (€6966) in 2010.

Leah Ingram, author of Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier and Healthier for Less believes that people can revisit everyday household tasks such as car buying, laundry and gardening to save themselves money throughout the course of the year.

As an example, Ingram states that the average American family spends up to $600 (€418) annually on water heating, which can be cut by washing clothes using cold water only. Homes also have an average of $90 of spare change in them, which can be collected. As American families also spend between $500 (€348) and $3,000 (€2090) on bottled water every year, despite perfectly drinkable tap water in most areas, she also suggests cutting out paying for drinking water.

Changing the way we shop is also a way to save money, the book advises. By working backwards when shopping for groceries, subtracting from the target amount as they shop, consumers avoid spending more than they want to. Buying a secondhand car can also save consumers a lot; Ingram cites Edmunds.com research that suggests that the first-year cost of owning a used car is nearly $5,000 (€3483) cheaper than owning a new car.

Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier and Healthier for Less is published in the US by Adams Media, priced $12.95 (€9).

10 ways to save $10,000 in 2010
From Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier and Healthier for Less
1. Change your thinking about buying a car
2. Find cheaper ways to be beautiful
3. Rethink your phone plan
4. Look for "found" money
5. Create a gift card wallet
6. Rethink how you do laundry
7. Get cash for your old electronics
8. Grow a garden
9. Start drinking tap water
10. Work backwards when you shop for groceries

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