Q&A

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Q I would like to buy a freehold property which at present has offices below and a flat above. I'm intending to live in the flat but will continue to rent the offices below. The current tenant has a rather loose arrangement with the vendor but has indicated he would like to stay on. Should I keep him on or buy the property with vacant possession?

Q I would like to buy a freehold property which at present has offices below and a flat above. I'm intending to live in the flat but will continue to rent the offices below. The current tenant has a rather loose arrangement with the vendor but has indicated he would like to stay on. Should I keep him on or buy the property with vacant possession?

Bel Travis, by email

A Confirm with the selling agent that the property is being sold with vacant possession and inform your solicitor of the current tenant arrangement. A tenancy does not have to have a written agreement to be legally binding and you should seek advice from your solicitor before proceeding any further. Buying the property with vacant possession would seem the safest option, bearing in mind that the tenant will need to be given notice to leave. You can then draw up a proper tenancy agreement for the new tenant.

Q I have been trying to sell my house for a year, well before the market slowed down. When I bought it seven years ago, several people were fighting over it. Yet I've had only two offers, neither of which became a sale. I've reduced the price and carried out repairs, such as replacing all the windows. It's in a "sought-after" location, close to good schools and transport links. No one can understand why it won't sell. Any ideas?

T Fulwell, by e-mail

A If you are selling through an estate agent, they should have provided you with feedback from people who have viewed the property. It sounds as if you have acted on some of their comments but you are probably reluctant to spend any more money on the house. Empty properties are sometimes difficult to sell, especially if they have been on the market for a long time. It may be worth getting a few new estate agents round to give their opinion. Compare your property with others in the same price range to see what is on offer. If you are sure there isn't a problem with the property itself, it could be down to price

Q Someone has made an offer on my house but I have taken an instant dislike to them. I have lovely neighbours and would not want to inflict this person on them. However, it is the only offer I have had. Am I being ridiculous?

MF, by email

A You are not obliged to accept an offer and you could stall the buyer by saying you were looking for a higher price. However, your agent may not react too kindly if it is a fair offer and there is no one else in the running. You can certainly say you would like to wait to see if you can get a better offer but you will have a dilemma if the offer is increased or it's the only one you get.

If you would like a query answered, e-mail: propertyq&a@independent. co.uk. Only those questions featured will be answered. Any advice given will not be legally binding

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