Q&A

Click to follow
The Independent Online

Q I have a number of cautions against my property at the land registry due to my partner's debts. Do they have a time limit? I cannot sell the house until I have had them removed.

Q I have a number of cautions against my property at the land registry due to my partner's debts. Do they have a time limit? I cannot sell the house until I have had them removed.

PP, by e-mail

A There is no time limit but you can apply to the land registry to have them "warned off" if you feel you have good cause. The people who logged the cautions will be given 14 days to respond. If they do not, then the cautions will be lifted (on an individual basis depending on who replies), but they can also put forward their own case to have the caution remain and reapply for a new caution at any time should the old one be lifted. If you dispute the caution you can ask for a hearing before the chief land registrar to put your case. You may be able to come to a financial agreement with the cautioner. Contact your district land registry office for more advice.

Q I would like to buy a house next to a graveyard and church but my friends are trying to put me off. I'm not afraid of ghosts but I'm beginning to wonder if it would be hard to sell the house in the future. What are the pitfalls?

Sue H, by e-mail

A The main concern would be one of security as it may be easy for intruders to access your property via the church grounds. Making sure the property is secure and well lit and, if possible, protected by a high fence or walls, would go some way to putting your mind at rest. Also consider whether Sunday services increase traffic and make parking difficult around your property, and if there are many weekly activities that would add to noise or congestion, such as playgroups or aerobic sessions in the church hall. If there is a chiming clock, or bell ringing takes place during the week, it could become a problem. Visit the property at these times and ask neighbours for their opinion. As far as reselling the property goes, if it doesn't bother you, then it's likely to appeal to someone else too.

Q We have bought a house next to a park where a large sycamore tree was giving out a good deal of shade. Just before we moved, the tree was struck by lightning and removed by the council. We are worried that its roots will dry up and cause cracking. Is there anything we can do?

RB, by e-mail

A Not much, I'm afraid. Presumably you had a survey done and it didn't throw up any problems with foundations. All you can do is keep a look out for any changes to your property and investigate them then.

If you would like a query answered, e-mail: propertyq&a@independent.co.uk. Only those questions featured will be answered. Any advice given will not be legally binding

Comments