Q&A: How can I come up with the right colour schemes for my house?

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The Independent Online

Q. I would like to buy an old property and spend time and money renovating it. Can you suggest where I would find out more about this type of project?
PA, by e-mail

Q. I would like to buy an old property and spend time and money renovating it. Can you suggest where I would find out more about this type of project?
PA, by e-mail

A. You could start with looking at the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) website www.spab.org.uk which has detailed information of courses it runs around the country covering the repair of old buildings. There is also a list of appropriate publications, leaflets and other information you may find very useful. A quarterly list of historic buildings in need of repair that are for sale or lease is also available to SPAB members. Telephone 020-7377 1644 for more details.

Q. I've recently moved and would like to redecorate on a fairly large scale. However, I'm having trouble imagining colours in the house. How can I come up with the right colour schemes?
CD, by e-mail

A. Painting the wall with large "swatches" of colours will give you some idea of the way colours change during the day. Also have a look at Crown paint's new website www.crownpaint.co.uk. This has an interactive colour scheming tool that allows you to load images of the rooms in your house and then choose colours from Crown's 2004 palette and "paint" the rooms in your house to see how they would look.

Q. I have been asked by an estate agent to provide proof of identity. Are they allowed to ask for this information and will it be kept on files?
AM, by e-mail

A. Since the money laundering regulation came into force in February you should be asked to show a valid passport, driving licence and official correspondence detailing your address to confirm who you are. This information is required to be kept on file for five years.

Q. I am trying to buy two properties at the same time as selling one, but the purchase of one is moving faster than the other. Can I do anything to slow it down without losing the property to someone else?
SP, by e-mail

A. It is very hard to co-ordinate the buying and selling of two properties, so three is a potential problem. However, your solicitor should be able to advise you on the exact position regarding exchange which is when you would usually have to provide a deposit of up to 10 per cent. Your solicitor should inform the other parties so they are aware of your situation and that you are doing everything you can to progress your sales and purchases.

If you would like a query answered, e-mail: propertyq&a@independent.co.uk. Only those questions featured will be answered. Any advice given will not be legally binding

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