Cricket: S Africa hope to weather storm

MEMORIES OF the only previous Test match between the teams, in Barbados almost seven years ago, loom large as South Africa and the West Indies enter the last decisive day of their first Test here today.

When the light darkened, the lightning flashed, the thunder rolled and the rain arrived at the Wanderers to end the fourth day 28 overs early, South Africa were about to set out on their quest for 164 for victory.

Disciplined bowling, with Shaun Pollock's 4 for 49 carrying him to his 100th wicket in his 26th Test, exploited technical and temperamental batting frailties and dismissed the West Indies for 170 in their second innings. It set up what should be a straightforward objective but home optimism is tempered by history and a cracked pitch of uneven bounce.

In the Barbados Test of March 1992, their first since their return to the international fold after 22 years, they began the last day 122 for 2, requiring 79 to win. Instead, they were routed by the same Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh who again stand between them and glory, their last eight wickets tumbling for 26.

Ambrose and Walsh have achieved similar rescue acts several times since. But their support is limited to the fast bowler Nixon McLean, in his fourth Test, and the leg-spinner Rawl Lewis, in his second, with the off-spin of Carl Hooper likely to be again missing because of a strained groin muscle.

The bigger threat to South Africa's hopes is likely to be the stormy weather.

After restricting South Africa to a negligible lead of seven on the third day, the West Indies appeared to hold the advantage of bowling on a last day pitch of dubious quality. But they would have sought a more substantial total than their eventual 170.

They were choked by the quality pace combination of Pollock and Allan Donald, which accounted for Philo Wallace, Brian Lara and Shivnarine Chanderpaul for 38 within the first 50 minutes.

It was a tough grind after that. The opener Clayton Lambert needed 114 balls and nearly three hours over 33, Hooper spent two hours and 90 balls over 34 and the left-handed wicketkeeper Ridley Jacobs just under three hours and 126 balls for a resolute 42.

The innings was wrapped up as the last three wickets tumbled in three balls.

Fourth day; West Indies won toss

WEST INDIES - First Innings 261 (S Chanderpaul 74).

SOUTH AFRICA - First Innings 268 (G Kirsten 62; C A Walsh 4-66).

WEST INDIES - Second Innings

(Overnight: 20 for 0)

C B Lambert c Boucher b Symcox 33

P A Wallace b Pollock 14

*B C Lara lbw b Donald 7

S Chanderpaul lbw b Pollock 1

S C Williams c Kallis b Terbrugge 12

R D Jacobs c Terbrugge b Symcox 42

C L Hooper lbw b Kallis 34

R N Lewis lbw b Pollock 10

N A M McLean c Cullinan b Symcox 11

C E L Ambrose not out 0

C A Walsh lbw b Pollock 0

Extras (b1 nb5) 6

Total 170

Fall: 1-24 2-33 3-38 4-53 5-80 6-148 7-148 8-170 9-170.

Bowling: Donald 15-6-28-1 (1nb); Pollock 20.3-4-49-4; Terbrugge 14-5- 23-1; Kallis 14-5-26-1; Symcox 18-9-43-3.

Umpires: C J Mitchley and D R Shepherd.

n Zimbabwe were heading for their first Test victory abroad after Henry Olonga and Mpum-elelo Mbangwa routed Pakistan for 103 in their second innings in the first Test in Peshawar yesterday. Needing 162 to win, Zimbabwe reached 70 for 1 at the close of the third day.

Scoreboard, Digest page 19

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + uncapped commission, Benefits, OTE £100k: SThree: ...

Guru Careers: Dining Room Head Chef

£32K: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Dining Room Head Chef to work for one of ...

Guru Careers: Pastry Sous Chef / Experienced Pastry Chef

£27K: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Pastry Sous Chef / Experienced Pastry Che...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + competitive: SThree: Are you a recent graduate loo...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine