Anderson basks in the upswing of fickle form

South Africa 119 England 121-3

With the England one-day team it is impossible to be sure: millionaires one match, paupers the next. It makes for an eccentric concoction. In the fourth one-day international against South Africa yesterday they were once more living in the lap of luxury having been scrabbling round dustbins for scraps two days earlier.

It was an extreme that might even have surprised the tourists who are accustomed to extremes. England won by seven wickets after bowling out South Africa for their lowest ODI total at home. Jimmy Anderson, making light of concerns about the state of his right knee and the discomforture of a bruised toe, took 5 for 23 with an exhibition of fast bowling which grew in authority with each wicket.

The defence of 119 was implausible and although England's stroll to an unassailable 2-1 series lead in the afternoon sunshine was not as jaunty as it might have been, the formality of victory was barely in danger. It was accompanied throughout by the St George's Park brass band whose happy melodies always multiply the faults of the Barmy Army.

Jonathan Trott, rapidly becoming England's most dependable batsmen, made his fifth half century of the tour and second of the series. Kevin Pietersen, rapidly becoming the least reliable, was out limply, chipping to mid-wicket having already been dropped. He was given a hostile reception by the crowd, who seem oblivious to Trott's South African origins but appear unable to forgive or forget Pietersen's. Maybe he is not as resilient to the jibes as once he was, or maybe he is keeping his powder dry for the Test series.

England captain Andrew Strauss said: "The important thing is that you assess the conditions and exploit them. Our bowlers did that. They were very accurate, bowled in partnerships and bowled wicket-taking deliveries which is invaluable. In every game in this series one side or other seems to grab hold of the momentum and not give it back."

South Africa, who should have been inspired by their victory in Cape Town on Friday night, played with the wisdom of men jet-lagged after the 70-minute flight. Their innings lasted only 36.5 overs. This re-fashioned team, like England's, is taking time to bed in and a day-night match in Durban to draw the series on Friday is hardly ideal. England, if they can hang around in Millionaire's Row a while longer, have an opportunity of securing their first one-day series win in South Africa.

On another day, South Africa might have bowled on winning the toss with the sun still hiding behind light cloud, but there was nothing untoward about the conditions. On another day, too, Graeme Smith, their captain, might not have been given out leg-before to the ball from Stuart Broad in the second over of the match which he played around after it pitched on leg. It was a solid appeal but not irresistible.

Early wickets were essential for England and this was the acme of early wickets. If Smith gets 50, as he has done 49 times in one-day matches, South Africa usually win, as they have done on 40 of those occasions. Anderson, operating from the Duckpond End – though there is now no evidence of either ducks or ponds – then removed Hashim Amla with a smart piece of cricket which may have replenished his confidence. He took out his second slip, Graeme Swann, and moved him to short mid-wicket, specifically to ensnare Amla.

The batsman obliged swiftly by flicking a full length ball in Swann's direction. Anderson had JP Duminy gloving a slow bouncer shortly after and when Tim Bresnan, rigorously accurate, was granted another lbw verdict of the might be or might not be variety against AB De Villiers it was merely a case of retrenchment for South Africa thereafter.

Only Alviro Petersen, batting with sense and control, offered what amounted to resistance. He is a Port Elizabeth lad whose father is still a taxi driver in the town and this was his first international on his home ground. His third successive fifty of the series was as efficiently constructed as the first two but it was of limited consequence in terms of affecting the outcome.

Anderson became the 17th English bowler to take five wickets in a one-day innings, four men having done so twice. He bowled Mark Boucher with a beauty which held its own past the outside of the bat, persuaded Ryan McLaren to carve a wider one to point and gave Johan Botha little chance in avoiding one which lifted one from a length.

The quality of South Africa's batting was vapid to put it politely, thought Geoff Boycott, summarising for Test Match Special put it somewhat more impolitely when his off-air comment as McLaren was dismissed – to wit that he was "a fucking tosser" – had the BBC apologising within minutes, to listeners if not automatically to the batsman.

England could not lose. Trott and Strauss flourished immediately and had put on 74 by the 16th over when Strauss was deceived by Botha. That was the first of three wickets to fall for nine runs with Paul Collingwood following Pietersen.

But Trott never looked anything less than assured – as he never has done since resuming his England career last August. There were seven fours in his 52, and five for Eoin Morgan, two of them sublime, as England got home with 112 balls remaining. The pity was that it prevented the band playing on.

Wins and roundabouts: *England's fluctuating recent limited-overs record v South Africa

2008
20 Aug T20 (Riverside) Abandoned
22 Aug ODI (H'gley) Won by 20 runs
26 Aug ODI (T Bridge) Won by 10 wkts
29 Aug ODI (Oval) Won by 126 runs
31 Aug ODI (Lord's) Won by 7 wkts
3 Sep ODI (S Gdns) No result

2009
11 June T20 (T Bridge) Lost by 7 wkts
27 Sep ODI (Centurion) Won by 22 runs
13 Nov T20 (Jo'burg) Won by 1 run
15 Nov T20 (Centurion) Lost by 84 runs
20 Nov ODI (Jo'burg) Abandoned
22 Nov ODI (Centurion) Won by 7 wkts
27 Nov ODI (Cape Town) Lost by 112 runs
29 Nov ODI (Port Eliz) Won by 7 wkts

Port Elizabeth: Scoreboard

South Africa won toss

England beat South Africa by seven wickets

SOUTH AFRICA

......... Runs......... 6s......... 4s......... Bls

H Amla c Swann b Anderson......... 11......... 0......... 2......... 22

*G Smith lbw b Broad......... 2......... 0......... 0......... 4

A de Villiers lbw b Bresnan......... 22......... 0......... 4......... 36

J Duminy c Prior b Anderson......... 6......... 0......... 1......... 10

A Petersen c Wright b Broad......... 51......... 0......... 5......... 79

†M Boucher b Anderson......... 13......... 0......... 2......... 23

R McLaren c Collingwood b Anderson......... 0......... 0......... 0......... 5

J Botha c Prior b Anderson......... 1......... 0......... 0......... 8

W Parnell c Strauss b Collingwood......... 1......... 0......... 0......... 14

M Morkel lbw b Collingwood......... 7......... 0......... 1......... 15

C Langeveldt not out......... 0......... 0......... 0......... 5

Extras (w 5)......... 5

Total (36.5 overs)......... 119

Fall: 1-6, 2-24, 3-35, 4-55, 5-78, 6-78, 7-83, 8-92, 9-113, 10-119.

Bowling: J Anderson 10-3-23-5, P Collingwood 4-0-20-2, T Bresnan 8-3-15-1, S Broad 9.5-0-30-2, L Wright 5-0-31-0.

ENGLAND

......... Runs......... 6s......... 4s......... Bls

J Trott not out......... 52......... 0......... 7......... 77

*A Strauss lbw b Botha......... 32......... 0......... 7......... 59

K Pietersen c de Villiers b Botha......... 3......... 0......... 0......... 6

P Collingwood c Boucher b McLaren......... 2......... 0......... 0......... 6

E Morgan not out......... 28......... 0......... 5......... 40

Extras (lb 1, w 3)......... 4

Total (3 wkts, 31.2 overs)......... 121

Fall: 1-74, 2-80, 3-83.

Did not bat: †M J Prior, L J Wright, S C J Broad, G P Swann, T T Bresnan, J M Anderson.

Bowling: J Botha 8-0-22-2, R McLaren 6-1-25-1, M Morkel 6.2-1-19-0, C Langeveldt 5-1-24-0, W Parnell 6-0-30-0.

Umpires: B G Jerling (Aus) & R J Tucker (Aus).

TV replay umpire : J D Cloete.

Match referee: M Erasmus.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Sheeran arrives at the 56th annual Grammy Awards earlier this year
musicYes, that would be Ed Sheeran, according to the BBC
Arts and Entertainment
AKB48 perform during one of their daily concerts at Tokyo’s Akihabara theatre
musicJapan's AKB48 are one of the world’s most-successful pop acts
News
Ian Thorpe has thanked his supporters after the athlete said in an interview that he is gay
people
News
The headstone of jazz great Miles Davis at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York
news
Arts and Entertainment
Brendan O'Carroll has brought out his female alter-ego Agnes Brown for Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie
filmComedy holds its place at top of the UK box office
News
newsBear sweltering in zoo that reaches temperatures of 40 degrees
Arts and Entertainment
Professor Kathy Willis will showcase plants from the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew
radioPlants: From Roots to Riches has been two years in the making
Arts and Entertainment
TV The follow-up documentary that has got locals worried
Arts and Entertainment
Eminem's daughter Hailie has graduated from high school
music
Arts and Entertainment
Original Netflix series such as Orange Is The New Black are to benefit from a 'substantial' increase in investment
TVHoax announcement had caused outrage
Life and Style
Swimsuit, £245, by Agent Provocateur
fashion

Diving in at the deep end is no excuse for shirking the style stakes

News
One Direction star Harry Styles who says he has no plans to follow his pal Cara Delevingne down the catwalk.
peopleManagement confirms rumours singer is going it alone are false
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily World Cup Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
In pictures: Breathtaking results of this weekend's 'supermoon'

Weekend's 'supermoon' in pictures

The moon appeared bigger and brighter at the weekend
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor