Ashes 2013: Darren Lehmann hit with ICC fine for Broad outburst

 

The Kia Oval

Darren Lehmann, the Australia coach, has been fined 20 per cent of his match fee by the International Cricket Council following his radio outburst earlier this week at England bowler Stuart Broad.

Lehmann admitted a charge of publicly criticising and making inappropriate comments about Broad, including accusing him of cheating and urging the Australian public to harass him at every turn when England arrive Down Under this winter.

The ICC chief executive, David Richardson said: "Whilst noting the context and nature of the comments made, showing mutual respect for one's fellow professionals – including for coaches, players and match officials – is a cornerstone of how we play the game."

The ruling brought a swift end to the controversy on a second day dominated by Australia. Steve Smith took advantage of England's lightweight bowling attack to help himself to a first Test century with a six off Jonathan Trott, who he described as a part-time bowler.

"I probably wouldn't have played that shot if it had been someone else bowling – if it was James Anderson or Stuart Broad – but Jonathan Trott is a part-time bowler. It was a good chance to get it out of the way and it came off in the end," Smith said.

The England bowling coach, David Saker, defended England's bowling line-up, which included debutants Chris Woakes and Simon Kerrigan, unused today, despite the ease with which Australia pounded their way to 492 for 8 declared. "I thought Woakes did really well," Saker claimed. "Bowling to Shane Watson yesterday, he is a world-class batsmen and will hit you for four if you are a bit off.

"I'm sure Simon would have wanted to bowl differently, but it is only the first half of the game, the second half he might come into it and we are hoping he will.

"We believe we can win the match," he added. "They are in a strong position. They have batted really well for two days, but if we can bat well enough for long enough we can still win.

"We thought it would be a dry wicket. We still think that. We picked a side that we thought would give us the best chance of winning the game. In the crucial parts of the games in this series we have been the better team. When the game is on the line we picked players who we thought could win us the game. That's the way we do it.

"Two days into a five day game its harsh to say we haven't got it right. After five days you can probably write what you want. If Simon Kerrigan bowls us to victory on day five it will be a feel-good story for a lot of people."

Saker was equally strident in his defence of an England over-rate that shrank to 11 in the last hour, at which some of the paying customers booed. "The ball was very wet," he said. "You are trying to dry the ball and deliver it dry to the bowler. You have to make sure the ball is as dry as you can make it that's the crux of it. A mostly educated crowd would have known that."

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