Ashes 2013: It's been tough but we fight on, says not so jolly Chris Rogers

 

Australia's senior player has reflected on the rigours of playing in an Ashes Test series. Chris Rogers was determinedly realistic and refreshingly candid, but he did not sound like a man who seriously thought that the 2-0 losing margin against England was about to be overturned.

"The pressures that come with playing international cricket are far more than in domestic cricket, naturally," he said. "It's still quite hard to experience once you're in, just the scrutiny I guess that comes with that, particularly as we haven't played to the standard that we would have liked, and myself individually."

Rogers was chosen for this tour at the age of 35 as the experienced old hand despite having made his only Test appearance five years ago. It was felt that his knowledge of English conditions playing for Middlesex and his calm demeanour would buttress a fragile batting order.

Although he scored a staunch half-century at Trent Bridge in the second innings of the first Test, it has not gone according to plan. At Lord's Rogers was out twice to Graeme Swann, lbw to a full toss which he ought to have reviewed, and then bowled by a ball to which he shouldered arms. He knew what to expect in this series, but it appears to have taken its toll.

"It's been tough to take in some respects but I knew this was going to happen so I've just got to get on with it," he said. "There's things about it that are quite intense and sometimes hard to enjoy. There's pros and cons, but I'm loving this opportunity."

Rogers will probably keep his place for the third Test but, like almost every other batsman in Australia's top order, he needs runs to continue to justify his selection. Darren Lehmann, the Australia coach, gave Rogers and Shane Watson his blessing as openers in a pre-emptive move almost as soon as he took over and it would be seen as panic to change after two matches.

But Australia seem certain to make at least one alteration to the team which were roundly defeated at Lord's, with David Warner coming in. He will probably dislodge Phil Hughes, who looks distinctly out of sorts and out of his class for the second successive Ashes series in England.

Steve Smith, another under-performer in the middle order, is in some discomfort with a sore back. Although it is assumed he will be fit, it may give the selectors an opportunity to try someone else. Australia need runs so desperately that they seem prepared to try almost any combination.

The fact they have settled neither on their personnel nor the order in which they will bat is testament to their present difficulties. They will not, it is presumed, make the mistake of fielding two spinners simply because England have two in their squad. Rogers assessed that the team has plenty to do.

He said: "I don't think there's anything else you can do, fight as hard as you can, try to stay out there and not surrender your wicket, which we've probably been doing a little bit too easily."

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific
In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

Dame Colette Bowe - interview
When do the creative juices dry up?

When do the creative juices dry up?

David Lodge thinks he knows
The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

Fashion's Cher moment

Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

Health fears over school cancer jab

Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

Weather warning

Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report
LSD: Speaking to volunteer users of the drug as trials get underway to see if it cures depression and addiction

High hopes for LSD

Meet the volunteer users helping to see if it cures depression and addiction
German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

Saving Private Brandt

A Belgian museum's display of the skeleton of a soldier killed at Waterloo prompts calls for him to be given a dignified funeral