Ashes 2013-14: Stuart Broad calls for big improvement and hopes privacy will get Jonathan Trott on road to recovery

England are looking to bounce back from a humiliating 381-run defeat to Australia although they are without batsman Trott after he left the tour with a stress-related illness

England must redouble their efforts to fight back in the Ashes, as they come to terms with Jonathan Trott's absence from the remainder of their tour.

Stuart Broad spoke on Wednesday of the impact of Trott's departure, after England's number three had to fly home because of a stress-related illness.

Trott twice fell cheaply to the bowling of Australia's match-winner Mitchell Johnson in England's shocking 381-run defeat in Brisbane.

England have since travelled on to Alice Springs, with a stop-off for Broad and five of his team-mates at the tourist attraction and sacred site of Uluru.

It is back to Alice, in the heart of Australia's barren 'red centre', for a two-day match against a CA Chairman's XI on Friday and Saturday - and then another flight south to Adelaide for next week's second Test.

Broad reflected on England's uncomfortable experiences at the Gabba, and in particular the shock of having to say goodbye so early in the tour to one of their most experienced and reliable batsmen.

He said: "It's heartbreaking for us to lose Trotty.

"He's been part of the side for four or five years - he's a fantastic guy.

"He gave us a lot of solidity in the number three spot.

"But the important thing is he's got the support of the changing room he's played with for 49 Tests.

"Everyone's looking out for him, and he gets a bit of privacy at home to get himself right.

"We wish him very well from Australia here."

Trott's problems aside, England's batting faltered alarmingly in the first Test as Johnson's pace and bounce helped to bowl them out for 136 and then 179.

"It was really disappointing from our point of view," said Broad, who took six for 81 in Australia's first innings.

"We sat in the changing rooms after the first day, and everyone was buzzing.

"We stamped our authority in the way we wanted to, but to follow that up with three really poor days hurt the team."

Broad is confident nonetheless England can improve, as they must and often have after poor starts to recent tours.

"If we judged the English cricket side on the first match of the series, we'd be the worst side in the world - because we don't have a good record in that.

"I can't put my finger on why, but it's something we need to improve.

"One thing is that we know we can get better throughout the series."

Much will rest, of course, on England's next performance.

Defeat would put them in a perilous position heading for the third Test at Perth, where Johnson helped Australia to their only victory in the 2010/11 Ashes.

"Adelaide will be a huge Test match, to get back into the series, but we have confidence and experience we can do that," added Broad.

"We have a group of players who are strong.

"They know when they've made mistakes and (need to) put them right."

While not wanting to speak too much of Trott, Broad revealed the squad as a whole had little knowledge of the batsman's issues.

He told BBC Radio Five Live: "I don't think the squad were overly aware of the troubles he had but it all turns to making sure he gets right now.

"I'm sure everyone over here in Australia is hoping he gets better as soon as he can."

He added: "I think it would be wrong of team-mates to talk too much about what Trotty has gone through.

"The key now is for him to have a bit of privacy and for him to work out everything himself and get his recovery right.

"I think it would be wrong for the media and players to talk about what has gone because that is not going to help him in any way at the moment."

Broad admitted the isolation of touring can take its toll, adding: "One thing is for sure - we are supported very well by the ECB and the PCA.

"There is a support network in place and helplines etc.

"But there is no doubt we do spend a lot of time away from our families and away from home: we can do 270, 280 nights a year in hotel rooms which can get quite hard especially with guys who miss their families."

PA

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