Ashes: Record stand puts England in control

England took command of the second Test after record-breaking performances from Paul Collingwood and Kevin Pietersen dominated Australia at the Adelaide Oval.

Resuming the second day on a promising 266 for three, the tourists finally declared on an imposing 551 for six after Collingwood and Pietersen both hit big centuries and shared a record 310-run stad.

Having dominated with the bat, England also made a crucial breakthrough with the ball before the close with captain Andrew Flintoff dismissing opener Justin Langer to leave Australia struggling on 28 for one.

But it was Collingwood and Pietersen who stole the spotlight after overhauling England's record fourth-wicket Ashes partnership of 288 recorded by Nasser Hussain and Graham Thorpe at Edgbaston in 1997.

Their efforts also beat the record fourth-wicket partnership at this ground, beating the 214 forged by Dean Jones and Allan Border against West Indies in 1988-9 while Collingwood's 206 was England's 10th highest Ashes innings in history.

The tourists had begun the day mindful of the fate which befell England at this ground four years ago, when they slipped from 295 for four at the end of the first day to 342 all out.

But the pair withstood everything Australia threw at them, including a spell when they tried to frustrate them with negative tactics, to reclaim the momentum following England's resounding 277-runs opening Test defeat at the Gabba.

It was a particularly memorable day for Durham all-rounder Collingwood, who missed out on a maiden Ashes century in the previous Test and may not have featured in the series had Marcus Trescothick not returned home with a recurrence of his stress-related illness.

Resuming overnight on a nervous 98, Collingwood showed great composure to reach the landmark off the second delivery he faced by clipping Brett Lee through mid-wicket for three.

He was almost run out on 109 after he pushed Glenn McGrath to mid-on and set off for a quick single only for Mike Hussey to miss the stumps at the non-striker's end with Collingwood stranded.

But other than that half-chance, Collingwood was impeccable in his shot selection and even out-scored big-hitting Pietersen during the afternoon session.

Pietersen had resumed overnight on 60 and almost fell before he had added to that total, surviving a strong appeal for a catch behind from Lee which umpire Steve Bucknor rejected.

He made Australia pay for that close shave, hitting three boundaries from McGrath's first over of the day and progressed to 99 by hitting Shane Warne down the ground for four and then a three through mid-wicket.

His century, the sixth of his England career and his second against Australia, was brought up with a snatched single off seamer Stuart Clark and threatened to light up the Adelaide Oval with a swashbuckling innings.

He was prevented from playing in his characteristic manner by Australia's negative tactics which included using Warne to bowl around the wicket and landing the ball outside Pietersen's leg-stump.

Collingwood was not given the same respect and happily took advantage, becoming the first England player to score a double hundred against Australia since Hussain at Edgbaston in 1997.

He brought up the incredible landmark by launching left-arm spinner Michael Clarke over the top for one of 16 boundaries and had progressed to 206 when he played a tired-looking shot and was caught behind off Clark.

Collingwood had batted for over eight hours and was followed back to the dressing room six overs after tea by Pietersen, who ran himself out attempting a quick single off Clark by Australian captain Ricky Ponting.

Flintoff finally declared after adding a quickfire 60 off 84 balls with Ashley Giles and then struck with the 12th legitimate delivery of the day, a bouncer which Langer could only fend to Pietersen in the gully.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project