Australia show cricket world that England whitewash was no fluke as Mitchell Johnson inspires them to victory over South Africa

World's number one Test side are blown away with a day to spare as Australia continue their impressive form

The venomous bowling of Mitchell Johnson helped Australia secure a comprehensive 281-run victory over South Africa with a day to spare in the first Test at SuperSport Park in Centurion.

Johnson, who took seven wickets in the first innings and five in the second for an impressive match haul of 12 for 127, was the clear man of the match against the world's number one Test team.

The Proteas had no real answer to the pace and bounce of Johnson, with only AB de Villiers managing to get among the runs for the home side. He scored 91 runs in the first innings and 48 in the second.

Michael Clarke was quick to make his declaration on day four, Shaun Marsh's dismissal prompting the Australia captain to put the Proteas in to chase a notional target of 482.

But Johnson removed openers Alviro Petersen and Graeme Smith inside the first four overs, with Peter Siddle skittling Faf du Plessis before Ryan Harris made Hashim Amla his first victim of the match.

Johnson quickly disposed of Duminy and McLaren for his 10th and 11th wickets, De Villiers becoming his 12th victim when driving a cutter towards Steve Smith at short cover.

Siddle then had Robin Peterson fooled with a grubber and, after Harris removed Steyn with a length ball, Morne Morkel was run out for a single run to bring the match to premature conclusion.

Australia's bowlers have earned the team an extra day's rest before the second Test in Port Elizabeth, and Johnson told espncricinfo: "We set the game up with our batters. We bowled really well as a team.

"We felt there was a little in the wicket, we saw Morne (Morkel) get some bounce.

"When plans come off it's really nice. I was very nervous and pumped up for this match, so to come out and do this is very good.

"I'm here to be the intimidator which is what I have done here. Now we have an extra day to get back up for it."

Steyn was the only other South African besides De Villiers to emerge from the match with much credit after his six wickets took his career total to 356.

His strike rate of 42 balls per wicket does, however, remain the lowest of those cricketers who have taken more than 300 Test wickets.

South Africa captain Graeme Smith said: "It's very disappointing. We've been outplayed from the word go.

"Probably one of the most disappointing four days as we've had as a team.

"We need to reflect, train hard and perform much better. It seemed to one of those games; bowlers picking up niggles, food poisoning.

"At 100 for four we were pretty happy. But credit to Mitchell Johnson.

"AB (de Villiers) showed tremendous skill on a difficult wicket, the rest of us have performed well for a period of time so need to look back to those moments.

"We allowed Australia to play front-runner cricket and that's unusual for us."

PA

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Sepp Blatter resignation: The beginning of Fifa's long road to reform?

Does Blatter's departure mean Fifa will automatically clean up its act?

Don't bet on it, says Tom Peck
Charles Kennedy: The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

The baby of the House who grew into a Lib Dem giant

Charles Kennedy was consistently a man of the centre-left, dedicated to social justice, but was also a champion of liberty and an opponent of the nanny-state, says Baroness Williams
Syria civil war: The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of this endless conflict

The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of Syria's endless civil war

Sahar Qanbar lost her mother and brother as civilians and government soldiers fought side by side after being surrounded by brutal Islamist fighters. Robert Fisk visited her
The future of songwriting: How streaming is changing everything we know about making music

The future of songwriting

How streaming is changing everything we know about making music
William Shemin and Henry Johnson: Jewish and black soldiers receive World War I Medal of Honor amid claims of discrimination

Recognition at long last

Jewish and black soldiers who fought in WWI finally receive medals after claims of discrimination
Beating obesity: The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters

Beating obesity

The new pacemaker which helps over-eaters
9 best women's festival waterproofs

Ready for rain: 9 best women's festival waterproofs

These are the macs to keep your denim dry and your hair frizz-free(ish)
Cycling World Hour Record: Nervous Sir Bradley Wiggins ready for pain as he prepares to go distance

Wiggins worried

Nervous Sir Bradley ready for pain as he prepares to attempt cycling's World Hour Record
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific