Bangladesh collapse hands victory to England

England 419 bt Bangladesh 216 & 123 by an innings and 80 runs

England took 10 Bangladesh wickets in a session for the second successive time to storm to an innings victory in well under three days and wrap up a 2-0 npower series success.

Steve Finn - with his second five-wicket haul in as many Tests - and James Anderson were the enforcers today at Old Trafford, after captain Andrew Strauss unsurprisingly made the tourists follow on.

They duly collapsed to 123 all out, replicating last night's disappointments but this time without the 108-run start opener Tamim Iqbal gave them on day two.

England, who had scored a laboured if eventually wide margin victory at Lord's last week and had to work hard too for their 2-0 win in Bangladesh three months ago, have resoundingly confirmed their superiority in Manchester.

First they batted deep to post a match-controlling 419, overcoming early blips on a spinner's pitch which confounded expectations of a much faster surface.

Then after weathering a storm from Tamim - so prolific against England - Graeme Swann and today the pace attack picked off the Bangladeshis almost at will.

After a two-hour rain delay kept them waiting past an early lunch to start their second innings, Bangladesh were vulnerable from the moment Tamim went, caught behind to Anderson from the second ball of the day - registering his first score under 50 against England since Chittagong in March six innings ago.

Anderson got his man by the same method for the second time in three balls, but the delivery which saw off Tamim after his hundred yesterday was a poor relation of the one which kicked from short of a length to do the trick this time.

Tamim's opening partner Imrul Kayes also departed with an identical scorecard entry for the second time in two sessions. It was a near action replay too as he failed to keep his hook at Finn down, picking out the same catcher too at deep backward-square rather than last night's long-leg.

There was an almost apologetic inevitability about the next two dismissals, Junaid Siddique pushing Anderson straight into the hands of gully and Jahurul Islam caught behind for a duck trying to cut Finn (five for 42) - giving the tall seamer his second wicket for three runs in seven balls.

With the top four gone for single-figure scores, favourable bowling conditions still prevailing under heavy cloud cover and the threat of Swann's spin still to come if necessary, the game was surely already up.

Mohammad Ashraful at least managed double-figures before failing to deal with Anderson's bounce, fencing a catch to second slip. Then debutant Ajmal Shahzad got in on the act in his second over, having replaced Finn at the Brian Statham end, ripping one between Shakib Al Hasan's bat and pad on the back foot to hit the top of off-stump.

But Mushfiqur Rahim and Mahmudullah kept England at bay for the next 10 overs, and Anderson was persuaded to take a well-earned break with figures of 10-3-16-3.

Prior, despite his three catches, was enduring an awkward day behind the stumps - and another four byes off Swann took Bangladesh past their worst Test total of 62.

England's short patience test soon ended when Strauss recalled Finn, who struck with the first ball of his second spell - a half-volley which Mushfiqur chipped straight into the hands of substitute fielder Karl Brown at mid-on.

Mahmudullah stayed long enough to ensure he would be by far top-scorer and had just slapped Finn for two consecutive pulled fours when he went after another short ball, the last of the over, only to glove another one behind to Prior.

Abdur Razzak also decided it was time for a little defiance, taking the long handle to Swann with two fours and a six in the next over.

But Finn was in the wings and had Shafiul Islam caught low down at slip, before another attempted big hit from Razzak ended up in a skier well taken at deep mid-off by Eoin Morgan - with Bangladesh still 80 runs short of making England bat again.

It was an ignominious end to the series for the tourists, who simply appeared to run out of puff after defying many predictions by proving plausible opponents for most of the first match but managing to do likewise for only short bursts in the second.

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