Bravo's batting encore sends India flying

The West Indies have been obliging visitors throughout a two-month tour of England and, in theory at least, they did their hosts another favour last night. Beating India by seven wickets was a real turn up for the World Twenty20 books and it means the tougher of the two Super Eight groups could turn into a real nail-biter.

Paul Collingwood’s team will be right back in the tournament if they can beat India at Lord’s tomorrow – a result which would almost certainly eliminate the holders. But whatever happens, Dwayne Bravo should remember yesterday’s tip-top performance with bat and ball.

The all-rounder was playing the Indian Premier League in South Africa, and supposedly recovering from an injury, while his team-mates were losing two Tests against England in May. Against India, though, he starred by taking four wickets and scoring an unbeaten 66, guiding West Indies over the winning line with eight balls to spare and making them look like genuine contenders for glory.

India and their thousands of supporters looked stunned. And no wonder. With Sachin Tendulkar watching from the sidelines, they totalled a barely competitive 153 for seven from their 20 overs and could have done with the Little Master’s know-how. Instead, Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s men slipped into trouble at 29 for three and were only partially revived by a 43-ball knock of 67 from Yuvraj Singh.

Tendulkar picks and chooses his tournaments these days. Yuvraj had to be just as selective over which balls to attack once Fidel Edwards had done early damage, aided and abetted by Bravo, whose heroics began when he had Gautam Gambhir brilliantly caught in the deep by Lendl Simmons. Bravo came back later to get among the middle order, but with 72 runs flowing from the last six overs, India finished with a bit of a flourish.

It was not enough, though. Irfan Pathan removed Andre Fletcher for a duck and Chris Gayle eventually miscued a pull against spinner Yusuf Pathan. But Bravo, supported by Simmons and then Shiv Chanderpaul when 54 runs were still needed, never looked like giving it away.

India switched between pace and spin but Bravo kept driving over extra cover before finishing the contest with a soaring six off Zaheer Khan. “It was a superb innings from Dwayne,” said Gayle. “I though their total was gettable and this is a big win for us because we needed to make a good start to this group.”

“We didn’t get off to a good start and did not get enough runs despite a brilliant innings from Yuvraj,” said Dhoni. “It should be an exciting game against England.”

*Sri Lanka shrugged off a batting stutter to open their Super Eight campaign with a comfortable 19-run victory over Pakistan. Despite a stand of 81 in nine overs between openers Tillakaratne Dilshan and Sanath Jayasuriya, they ended on 150 for seven but that proved enough once Lasith Malinga (3-17) got cracking.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine