Caddick has chance to repel young pretenders

England trio fail to erase doubts ahead of Ashes tour while Surrey youngster is added to one-day squad

Andrew Caddick, John Crawley and Dominic Cork will not have been among the least apprehensive of the England players taking part in the last Test match of the summer. Of course, it is important that England should win here and obliterate the memory of Headingley, which tarnished the otherwise good performances of this summer. But, being only human, the eye of the three Cs will have been on Australia as much as India.

Caddick will probably have felt that he had less to worry about than the other two. He has suffered from injury this year and was forced to miss two Test matches. When he returned at Headingley, he bowled appallingly, being unable to find either the right line or length.

One of the troubles with Caddick is that he wears his heart on his sleeve and never leaves anyone in the slightest doubt if he feels that the odds are stacked against him. One can only wonder if this apparent discontent carries over into the dressing-room and, if it does, what effect it has.

Before choosing him for Australia, the selectors will want to be as certain as they can about his continued fitness, just as they will be about Darren Gough's. The early wicket of Virender Sehwag on the second day will have done as much good to his morale as it clearly did for his body language. None the less, Caddick must make sure that he gets it right over the last three days of this match for there are a number of young contenders in the wings.

Crawley has already had two relatively modest tours of Australia which were partially redeemed by good innings in Tests in Adelaide and Sydney – he is good against the turning ball. His problem is at the other end of the scale. Glenn McGrath and company have him marked down as one of those who is not always in control against their pace and lift on and around the off stump. They will continually bowl to him down this dreaded corridor.

The runs Crawley has made in the two series this summer against Sri Lanka and India may therefore turn out to be nothing more than red herrings. Would it not be more sensible to take Mark Ramprakash who was altogether more effective when England were in Australia four years ago? Or is his personality and somewhat questionable temperament considered to be extra baggage the team cannot afford? So far Crawley has done nothing to advance the cause of his selection in this fourth Test match.

Finally, there is the uncomfortable thought that Cork's competent half century in England's first innings at the Oval may have furthered his case for selection for Australia. Cork's main occupation is to take wickets and it is here that he has been found wanting.

The outswinger, if it goes at all, does so much too early in the flight to be dangerous. He was no real threat in Australia four years ago and is highly unlikely to be now. If the need for Cork has been seriously discussed, one hopes the greater need for Craig White will have won the day.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor