Chris Rogers raps out an Ashes message with double ton

Middlesex 166 & 514-8 Surrey 338 & 85-1 Match drawn

Lord's

The Middlesex captain and potential Ashes opener Chris Rogers cracked a brilliant double hundred at Lord's before letting his side's First Division match with neighbours Surrey drift into a draw.

Rogers – who played his solitary Test match for Australia against India back in 2008 – is back in the Baggy Green squad for this summer's series and staked his claim for a spot in Michael Clarke's side with a thrilling 214, the ninth double hundred of his first-class career.

Rogers batted like a man who wanted to send a message to the Aussie selectors as well as lead his side to victory in adding 83 to his overnight 131 off 67 balls with 10 fours and two sixes, but by the time he declared at 514 for 8, Surrey needed 343 to win from only 48 overs.

They were never going to get the runs and Middlesex were never going to bowl them out on a flat pitch either but, after being forced to follow on 172 runs behind, Rogers was happy to settle for a draw which keeps his side on the heels of early leaders Durham and leaves Surrey still looking for their first win of the season.

The second new ball was only five overs old when Middlesex began the final day at 283 for 2, 111 runs ahead, but after nightwatchman Steve Finn had edged Jade Dernbach to third slip, Rogers and Dawid Malan had few problems putting on 130 in 22 overs.

Rogers, normally a neat, methodical accumulator of runs, was at his most expansive, cutting, driving and pulling Tim Linley and Zander de Bruyn into the stands until he was bowled trying to sweep off-spinner Gareth Batty.

Rogers had been there more than seven hours, faced 307 balls and hit 20 fours and two sixes.

He had almost batted Surrey out of the game but they were still in with a chance when Chris Tremlett had Malan caught at mid-on and Paul Stirling held in the gully in successive overs to leave Middlesex 252 ahead with four wickets left.

It was not long, however, before the part-time bowlers were on in a bid to hasten the declaration and Neil Dexter and John Simpson had helped themselves to 90 in 18 overs when Dexter swung Rory Burns to mid-wicket to give the opening batsman his maiden wicket in first-class cricket.

Arun Harinath also picked up his first wicket, Toby Roland-Jones clubbing him to deep midwicket, before Rogers finally declared, leaving Graeme Smith, the Surrey captain, with little option other than to settle for batting practice after averaging only 18 in his first four Championship innings.

Smith had made 48 of Surrey's 85 for 1 when the teams shook hands on a draw, with Burns the solitary man out, caught by Simpson off Tim Murtagh for 17.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?