De Villiers turns the screw on West Indies

South Africa's second-wicket pair, AB de Villiers and Boeta Dippenaar, continued their slow, deliberate torment of the West Indies on the third day of the Third Test until a run-out in the last over before lunch brought relief to the home team.

South Africa's second-wicket pair, AB de Villiers and Boeta Dippenaar, continued their slow, deliberate torment of the West Indies on the third day of the Third Test until a run-out in the last over before lunch brought relief to the home team.

Dippenaar attempted a single to short-fine leg but was well short at the bowler's end when substitute Dwayne Smith's throw broke the stumps, It seemed the only way the West Indies could claim a wicket on a pitch reminiscent of those that made Kensington Oval a batting paradise in the 1950s and 1960s.

In his first match of the series, Dippenaar was on his way to the third hundred of the innings when dismissed for 71. De Villiers, the stylish 21-year-old right-hander in his eighth Test, carefully moved from his overnight 122 to 178 before edging Reon King to the wicketkeeper as South Africa advanced to 417 for 4 at tea. Herschelle Gibbs followed, caught at slip for eight.

After sharing an opening stand of 191 with his captain Graeme Smith, 104, on the previous day that set the platform for South Africa's commanding position, he took 23 balls over his first run of the day against accurate fast bowling by Daren Powell and Fidel Edwards, leaving Dippenaar to keep the score moving. Only a succession of diving saves at extra-cover by Dwayne Bravo denied both batsmen certain boundaries off the medium-pace of Reon King.

Once De Villiers and Dippenaar got through the first hour, carefully adding 34 off 13 overs, they increased the tempo as Powell and Edwards were rested. Bravo's five overs of medium-pace cost 21, off-spinner Chris Gayle was taken for 22 from his two overs and Dippenaar stepped out to hoist left-arm spinner Ryan Hinds for a straight six.

In contrast to last season's Test against England ,when a fast, bouncy pitch produced first innings totals of 226 and 224 and a second innings West Indies collapse to 94, conditions have reverted to those of an earlier, batsman friendly era. Only Brian Lara took advantage for the West Indies with his second masterpiece in successive Tests, 176 filled with breathtaking strokes in all directions.

But the loss of three wickets for 12 at the top of the order and the last five for 10 once Lara was dismissed by Andre Nel late with the second new ball late on the first day committed them to an inevitable struggle.

Eleven of the 13 Tests on the ground between 1948 and 1974 were high-scoring draws that included Pakistani Hanif Mohammed's 337 in 1958 that lasted 999 minutes, Test cricket's longest innings, Lawrence Rowe's 304 against England in 1974 and six other double hundreds.

To end the sequence, there was a deliberate policy to inject more life into the square in the 1970s and 1980s, an era that coincided with the emergence of the famously menacing West Indies fast bowlers.

It has reverted to its original state for this match and the use of the heaviest roller available between innings drew whatever little life existed.

It has proved hard work for an inexperienced West Indies attack in which no bowler has more than 40 wickets to his name. They toiled stoically but have been unable to make an impression on their focussed opponents who lead 1-0 in the series after their Second Test victory in Port-of-Spain.

Life and Style
health

Do you qualify – and how do you get it?

News
Food blogger and Guardian writer Jack Monroe with her young son
people
News
i100
News
Privately schooled, Oxford educated and a former editor of arguably the world's poshest magazine 'The Lady', it's perhaps unsurprising that Rachel Johnson rarely mixes with ordinary Proles.
people

The Mayor of London's sister, Rachel Johnson, apologises for shocking tweet about the PM

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Environment
The plant ‘Nepenthes zygon’ was donated to Kew in 2004
environmentNepenthes zygon had been growing for almost a decade and helping to keep down cockroaches
News
This artist impression shows a modern-day Atlantis
news
Arts and Entertainment
booksPhotographer snapped celebrities for 40 years - but it wasn’t all fun and games
News
i100
Sport
Aguero - who single-handedly has kept City's Champions League dreams alive - celebrates his dramatic late winner
footballManchester City 3 Bayern Munich 2: Argentine's late hat-rick sees home side snatch vital victory
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Drifting and forgotten - turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Our partner charities help veterans on the brink – and get them back on their feet
Putin’s far-right ambition: Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU

Putin’s far-right ambition

Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU
Tove Jansson's Moominland: What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?

Escape to Moominland

What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?
Nightclubbing with Richard Young: The story behind his latest book of celebrity photographs

24-Hour party person

Photographer Richard Young has been snapping celebrities at play for 40 years. As his latest book is released, he reveals that it wasn’t all fun and games
Michelle Obama's school dinners: America’s children have a message for the First Lady

A taste for rebellion

US children have started an online protest against Michelle Obama’s drive for healthy school meals by posting photos of their lunches
Colouring books for adults: How the French are going crazy for Crayolas

Colouring books for adults

How the French are going crazy for Crayolas
Jack Thorne's play 'Hope': What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

Playwright Jack Thorne's latest work 'Hope' poses the question to audiences
Ed Harcourt on Romeo Beckham and life as a court composer at Burberry

Call me Ed Mozart

Paloma Faith, Lana del Ray... Romeo Beckham. Ed Harcourt has proved that he can write for them all. But it took a personal crisis to turn him from indie star to writer-for-hire
10 best stocking fillers for foodies

Festive treats: 10 best stocking fillers for foodies

From boozy milk to wasabi, give the food-lover in your life some extra-special, unusual treats to wake up to on Christmas morning
Phil Hughes head injury: He had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Phil Hughes had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Prolific opener had world at his feet until Harmison and Flintoff bounced him
'I have an age of attraction that starts as low as four': How do you deal with a paedophile who has never committed a crime?

'I am a paedophile'

Is our approach to sex offenders helping to create more victims?
How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

Serco given Yarl’s Wood immigration contract despite ‘vast failings’
Green Party on the march in Bristol: From a lost deposit to victory

From a lost deposit to victory

Green Party on the march in Bristol
Putting the grot right into Santa's grotto

Winter blunderlands

Putting the grot into grotto
'It just came to us, why not do it naked?' London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital

'It just came to us, why not do it naked?'

London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital